Buitrago del Lozoya Castle

Buitrago del Lozoya, Spain

The town of Buitrago del Lozoya is completely surrounded by an ancient wall originally built by the Moorish people. Within these walls lies the ruins of the Buitrago de Lozoya castle. The style of the castle is a unique mix of Mudéjar (moorish) and Gothic designs – tall, solid square towers combined with the typical pentagonal shaped often used by the ancient Arabs. It was built in the 15th century. It has a rectangular plan, with seven towers of various shapes (round, pentagonal, square), all in stone. The interior is in ruins.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Linette Achecar (3 years ago)
Simply Beautiful!! Buitrago is a small treasure close to Madrid. Yo can enjoy doing kayak, trekking, horse riding and eating good spanish food and amazing views.
Janina Gallegos (4 years ago)
Charming little town in the highlands. Worth to visit!
Natacha Sánchez (NZV) (4 years ago)
Very nice view. Unfortunately when we arrived it was closed but we walked around the town on the walls surrounding the town, very beautiful view.
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