Porte du Scex Castle

Vouvry, Switzerland

Porte du Scex Castle was originally built to protect the territory of Vouvre and collect tolls. In the Middle Ages it was owned by Savoy and Tavelli de la Tour families. The castle was rebuilt between 1591 and 1609 and again in 1678. The museum opened in the Porte-du-Scex castle in 2008. It houses an interactive and in 3D model of the Chablais region, that is part of the permanent collection. Other rooms are dedicated to temporary exhibitions concerning the history and cultural heritage of the region, and which change every two years.

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Address

Vouvry, Switzerland
See all sites in Vouvry

Details

Founded: 1591
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Franck Schneider (3 years ago)
Entre deux Canton, Vaud et Valais, le musée présente patrimoine du Chablais vaudois et du Chablais valaisan. Depuis 2008, le musée est installé dans le Château de la Porte-du-Scex, à Vouvry. Une grande maquette en 3D interactive permet de découvrir le Chablais.
Franck Schneider (3 years ago)
Between two Canton, Vaud and Valais, the museum presents the heritage of Chablais Vaudois and Chablais Valaisan. Since 2008, the museum has been located in the Château de la Porte-du-Scex, in Vouvry. A large interactive 3D model allows you to discover the Chablais.
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