Santa Àgueda Castle

Ferreries, Spain

The Castle of Santa Àgueda is situated over an elongated plateau. The castle is accessed by an ancient Roman road. Next to the castle there was also, until recently, a chapel dedicated to Saint Agatha.

The castle was built over an ancient Roman castra by the Arabs, when Menorca was part of the Caliphate of Cordoba. The exact date of its construction is not known, but it was prior to 1232. In 1287, it became the last standpoint of resistance by the Arab inhabitants when the island was invaded by King Alfonso III of Aragon. The castle was later destroyed by Alfonso's grand-nephew King Peter IV of Aragon around 1343.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lluís Badia Corbella (2 years ago)
Excellent views over the Island
Olivier Odelin (2 years ago)
Lovely views over the North coast from the ruins of this ancient castle. Fairly easy climbing walk to access but it is unfortunate there is no parking at start...Visit in winter/spring
Jill Fellows (2 years ago)
Amazing views.
Tina@googlemail.com Tinsley (3 years ago)
Well worth the walk, amazing views
Caroline Chalfont (3 years ago)
Lovely walk. Lots to see.
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