l'Argentina Navetas

Alaior, Spain

Biniac has two circular burial navetas that were used around 1400 B.C. and are from an earlier period than the long rectangular constructions like the Es Tudons and Rafal Rubí navetas. The east naveta was built on bedrock and has only one oval-shaped chamber, accessed via a perforated stone slab. Several slabs that had fallen over were found inside. The west naveta is also oval-shaped and the wall on the south side has dry stone cladding, clearly added at a later date.

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Founded: 1400 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

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User Reviews

Jesús González Palomo (19 months ago)
Ahora gestionada por los propietarios del parque zoológico tiene unos horarios de visita que hay que confirmar con la propiedad pero vale la pena ver este ejemplo de naveta de planta redonda. Está en muy buen estado de conservación. Y su prácticamente gemela naveta de biniac occidental no puede decir lo mismo, pero en ella se puede observar perfectamente otros aspectos arquitectónicos.
Blanca Zeberio (2 years ago)
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