Santa Eulàlia Church

Alaior, Spain

The Santa Eulàlia church in Alaior is built atop a hill. The village formed around it from the 14th century onwards. There was apparently an earlier church, of which the vaulted arches of the main facade and a part of the side wall may remain. The parish was founded in the early 14th century, and is mentioned as early as the Pariatge of 1301 signed by James II of Majorca. The current building was erected between approximately 1630 and 1690. The church has a number of Baroque elements, although it features are of a Renaissance church, with a clearly Mannerist influence. It is one of the most spacious churches on the island. The layout comprises a single nave with an arched barrel vault and six side chapels, interconnected by an open passage built in 1735.

The parish church was also required to serve as a shelter for the village population in the event of invasion, hence its solid structure and the great size of the nave. The main facade is one of the most original on the island. The lower body contains simply the main gateway, and is reached via a ramp and stairway. The upper body, which is set back to leave a passageway connecting the two towers at each end, features a rose window. During the Civil War the church was sacked, and the organ, altars, paintings and Baroque reredoses of the main altar and other ornamental elements destroyed. During the current restoration, the most significant ever performed, the original masonry of unclad marès sandstone has been reinstated.

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Details

Founded: 1630-1690
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.menorca.es

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Juan Morales Castell (2 years ago)
Si vienes de visita por Alaior. No puedes irte sin pasar a ver esta gran iglesia.
Xim Martinez i Calduch (2 years ago)
Una església tradicional. La recient restauració ha deixat al descobert uns enterraments a la part esquerra i devora l'entrada. A més és possible fer una visita turística a la part superior o sota teulada, per damunt de la volta de pedra.
Pe Mes Kepens (2 years ago)
Una església preciosa. De fora, sembla una fortalesa. I de fet, ho va ser. És, en quant a grandària l'església més gran de Menorca.
Goran Lekic (2 years ago)
A nice place, churc, historical monument, Menorca, nice panorams
Sue Malloch (4 years ago)
Worth a visit lovely town
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Heraclea Lyncestis

Heraclea Lyncestis was an ancient Greek city in Macedon, ruled later by the Romans. It was founded by Philip II of Macedon in the middle of the 4th century BC. The city was named in honor of the mythological hero Heracles. The name Lynkestis originates from the name of the ancient kingdom, conquered by Philip, where the city was built.

Heraclea was a strategically important town during the Hellenistic period, as it was at the edge of Macedon"s border with Epirus to the west and Paeonia to the north, until the middle of the 2nd century BC, when the Romans conquered Macedon and destroyed its political power. The main Roman road in the area, Via Egnatia went through Heraclea, and Heraclea was an important stop. The prosperity of the city was maintained mainly due to this road.

The Roman emperor Hadrian built a theatre in the center of the town, on a hill, when many buildings in the Roman province of Macedonia were being restored. It began being used during the reign of Antoninus Pius. Inside the theatre there were three animal cages and in the western part a tunnel. The theatre went out of use during the late 4th century AD, when gladiator fights in the Roman Empire were banned, due to the spread of Christianity, the formulation of the Eastern Roman Empire, and the abandonment of, what was then perceived as, pagan rituals and entertainment.

Late Antiquity and Byzantine periods

In the early Byzantine period (4th to 6th centuries AD) Heraclea was an important episcopal centre. A small and a great basilica, the bishop"s residence, and a funerary basilica and the necropolis are some of the remains of this period. Three naves in the Great Basilica are covered with mosaics of very rich floral and figurative iconography; these well preserved mosaics are often regarded as fine examples of the early Christian art period.

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