Santa Eulàlia Church

Alaior, Spain

The Santa Eulàlia church in Alaior is built atop a hill. The village formed around it from the 14th century onwards. There was apparently an earlier church, of which the vaulted arches of the main facade and a part of the side wall may remain. The parish was founded in the early 14th century, and is mentioned as early as the Pariatge of 1301 signed by James II of Majorca. The current building was erected between approximately 1630 and 1690. The church has a number of Baroque elements, although it features are of a Renaissance church, with a clearly Mannerist influence. It is one of the most spacious churches on the island. The layout comprises a single nave with an arched barrel vault and six side chapels, interconnected by an open passage built in 1735.

The parish church was also required to serve as a shelter for the village population in the event of invasion, hence its solid structure and the great size of the nave. The main facade is one of the most original on the island. The lower body contains simply the main gateway, and is reached via a ramp and stairway. The upper body, which is set back to leave a passageway connecting the two towers at each end, features a rose window. During the Civil War the church was sacked, and the organ, altars, paintings and Baroque reredoses of the main altar and other ornamental elements destroyed. During the current restoration, the most significant ever performed, the original masonry of unclad marès sandstone has been reinstated.

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Details

Founded: 1630-1690
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

www.menorca.es

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Roy van der Steen (22 months ago)
Beautifull church
Louise Davies (2 years ago)
Went for a fiesta. Fabulous experience.
Steve Tilley (2 years ago)
Intersting
Juan Morales Castell (2 years ago)
Si vienes de visita por Alaior. No puedes irte sin pasar a ver esta gran iglesia.
Xim Martinez i Calduch (2 years ago)
Una església tradicional. La recient restauració ha deixat al descobert uns enterraments a la part esquerra i devora l'entrada. A més és possible fer una visita turística a la part superior o sota teulada, per damunt de la volta de pedra.
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