Ciutadella de Menorca Cathedral

Ciutadella de Menorca, Spain

The Cathedral Basilica of Ciutadella de Menorca was constructed on the orders of King Alfonso III of Aragon, the conqueror of the island, in 1287 on the site of an old mosque.

Construction started in 1300 and was finished in 1362, creating a building of the Catalan Gothic style, and is notable for the width of the nave, flanked by six chapels to each side. The five-sided apse is oriented to the east.

After the desecration and devastation of the cathedral by the Ottoman Empire Turks under Admiral of the Ottoman Fleet Pialí Bajá in 1558 and the collapse of the vaults of the apse in 1626, the damage was quickly repaired in the original style.

In 1795, with the restoration of the old bishopric of Menorca (which had existed at start of the 5th century) the parish church of Ciutadella came to be the cathedral of the new diocese.

Under Bishop Juano, the main façade was rebuilt in 1813 in a neoclassical style, contrasting with the Gothic style of the building, while the restored side door called the Porta de la Llum ('Portal of the Light') keeps some of its medieval ornamentation.

In the interior, the baroque chapel of the Angelus dates from the start of the 17th century with exquisitely-carved columns.

The cathedral was sacked and desecrated in the first days of the Spanish Civil War in 1936, but was restored in its current form by Bishop Bartolomé Pascual between 1939 and 1941. During this work, the Quire was moved from the nave to its current location in the apse.

The great altar is a marble monolith covered by a 15-metre-high canopy. At the back of the apse, under an image of the Virgin in the mystery of the presentation of Jesus in the temple, is found the episcopal throne, made with Roman marble blessed by Pope Pius XII to signify the links of faith and devotion of this church of Menorca to St. Peter's Basilica. In 1953 Pope Pius XII gave the cathedral the title of minor basilica.

From 1987, the seventh centennial of the conquest of Menorca by the Crown of Aragon, a new plan was undertaken for the restoration and development of the cathedral.

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Details

Founded: 1300-1362
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

justin carl pearn (2 years ago)
A fantastic city to visit for the day. All the old stone buildings and cobbled streets. The sights,the sounds it certainly is a amazing place, you could easily get lost in the many little alleys and streets. Lots of shops, lots of restaurants, a perfect day out.
Jon Thompson (2 years ago)
We didn't actually visit here as run out of time. I would recommend visiting this town as it has more history then Mao/mahon. Easy to get around with numerous restaurants.
shaun (2 years ago)
A beautiful Cathedral situated right in the heart of the city. Typically Spanish in design both exterior and interior. As you would expect within the walls of a religious building the atmosphere was both peaceful and relaxing, gives you time to reflect and get out of the hot sun for a little while.
Catherine Cheater (2 years ago)
Absolutely beautiful! So interesting to discover the history of this lovely place of worship through the ages. The ticket also gives entry to the convent, with its beautiful central courtyard.
Janet Tate (2 years ago)
Atmospheric .historical.city. Shops.bars.cafes.Resturants. Buildings are a sight not to be missed . The town hall is open for all .still working but tourists may wander in and view this amazing building.it is beautiful and ornate. The city itself is ornate with streets leading from 1 square to the next.each with .Resturants.shops.cafes that are unique.the main square around the bus station has its own outdoor gym .cafes.bars to sit and watch the world go by.
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