Rabenstein Castle

Chemnitz, Germany

Rabenstein Castle is the smallest medieval castle in Saxony. It is located in the Chemnitz suburb of Rabenstein and belongs to the Chemnitz Castle Hill Museum.

The hill castle Rabenstein was first mentioned in 1336 in a document from Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor in which he promised it as a fief to his son-in-law Frederick II, Margrave of Meissen, in case the line of Waldenburg were to die out without male heirs.

At this time the castle was larger than the current. The castle walls consisted of a 180 m long wall, which enclosed an area of two hectares.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Moj Život Je Novi Val (UltraRockAgency) (7 months ago)
Beautiful castle with interesting exhibitons, absolutely recommended!
scorbio (9 months ago)
My dream house
LS (9 months ago)
There’s not much to it here, but it’s gorgeous and nice to walk around :)
Bob Parker (2 years ago)
Fun little castle. They were having a festival and it was a bit crowded. We did go into the castle and enjoyed its history.
Celebdae 13 (3 years ago)
Closed due to covid but fun to look at this lil cutsie "Castle"
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