Rabenstein Castle

Chemnitz, Germany

Rabenstein Castle is the smallest medieval castle in Saxony. It is located in the Chemnitz suburb of Rabenstein and belongs to the Chemnitz Castle Hill Museum.

The hill castle Rabenstein was first mentioned in 1336 in a document from Louis IV, Holy Roman Emperor in which he promised it as a fief to his son-in-law Frederick II, Margrave of Meissen, in case the line of Waldenburg were to die out without male heirs.

At this time the castle was larger than the current. The castle walls consisted of a 180 m long wall, which enclosed an area of two hectares.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sarah Schaarschmidt (17 months ago)
Wir waren am Ostersamstag, den 20.04.2019, zum Mittelaltermarkt dort und es war wunderschön und richtig gut organisiert. Der Mittelaltermarkt war sehr authentisch und hat perfekt in die Natur reingepasst. Man fühlte sich wirklich wie in diese Zeit zurück versetzt. Der kleine Schwertkampf von ein paar Rittern war auch richtig gut sowie Ihre Rüstungen. Die Budenbetreiber waren entsprechend gekleidet und alle sehr nett. Von Wegezoll, über Taler die man als Währung nutzte, bishin zum Eselreiten und für die Kinder richtig tolle Schilde, Pfeil und Bogen, Morgensterne mit Schaumstoffkugel zum kaufen. Immer wieder gerne, es war sehr toll.
Carlyle Sutphen (17 months ago)
It was time to take a break on the way home after 2 and a half hours but we didn't want to go to a rest stop on the autobahn. So we checked Google maps and saw a lake and thought that would be a good place to look. On the way to the lake, w saw this place and are really glad we did.
Ashley Robert (2 years ago)
This is a nice little Burg that has great green areas surrounding it.
Saki Billah (2 years ago)
Nice
Martin Wagner (2 years ago)
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