Monument to the Battle of the Nations

Leipzig, Germany

The Monument to the Battle of the Nations (Völkerschlachtdenkmal) is dedicated to the 1813 Battle of Leipzig, also known as the Battle of the Nations. Paid for mostly by donations and the city of Leipzig, it was completed in 1913 for the 100th anniversary of the battle at a cost of six million goldmarks.

The monument commemorates Napoleon's defeat at Leipzig, a crucial step towards the end of hostilities in the War of the Sixth Coalition. The coalition armies of Russia, Prussia, Austria and Sweden were led by Tsar Alexander I of Russia and Karl Philipp, Prince of Schwarzenberg. There were German speakers fighting on both sides, as Napoleon's troops also included conscripted Germans from the left bank of the Rhine annexed by France, as well as troops from his German allies of the Confederation of the Rhine.

The structure is 91 metres tall. It contains over 500 steps to a viewing platform at the top, from which there are views across the city and environs. The structure makes extensive use of concrete, and the facings are of granite. It is widely regarded as one of the best examples of Wilhelmine architecture. The monument is said to stand on the spot of some of the bloodiest fighting, from where Napoleon ordered the retreat of his army.

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Details

Founded: 1913
Category: Statues in Germany
Historical period: German Empire (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Enmanuel Rumbos (4 months ago)
Not as I is or popular as the other attractions, this is worth a visit. It's old, impressive and it elicits more questions than answers. If you are in town, it's a must see
Prem S Sodha (9 months ago)
An absolutely incredible monument. The place has got a lot of history to it. get a splendid view of leipzig from top.The architecture and stone-work are so impressive because when you look at them closely, you can see how precisely every stone was cut, and how seamlessly they all fit together. Climb the many many steps to the roof for an amazing panoramic view. good parking spaces directly at the monument.
Chia-chen Lehahn (11 months ago)
The museum is small but very informative. The entrance fee is reasonable. The building itself is worth a visit. You should go inside and use the stairs if you can.
Melissa Iorio (12 months ago)
This monument is beautiful. It is breathtakingly large! We didn’t pay for tickets and were able to go in to see the 4 massive statues and it was really cool. A must see if you’re near Leipzig.
Luba B (14 months ago)
Impressive to see in person. They're pretty strict with the hours of admission but if you miss the entry times, it is still worth checking out. The views are great and it gives you a sense of strength to climb up all of those stairs.
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