Neurathen Rock Castle

Rathen, Germany

Neurathen Castle (Felsenburg Neurathen), which was first mentioned by this name in 1755, is located near the famous Bastei rocks near Rathen in Saxon Switzerland. This was once the largest rock castles in the region, but today only the rooms carved out of the rock, passages, the cistern and rebates for the timber of the former wooden superstructure have survived. In the years 1982–1984 parts of the extensive castle were used to build the open-air museum.

The beginnings of Neurathen date back to the first half of the 13th century, however the site may have been inhabitated already in the Bronze Ages. The castle was inherited and sold, repeatedly besieged, conquered and burned in the wars between Bohemian and Saxonian armies. In 1485 it fell to the Duke Albrecht, but he never restored it and the castle eventually collapsed. During the Thirty Years' War, his ruins served to shelter the inhabitants of Pirna before the Swedes.

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Address

Basteiweg, Rathen, Germany
See all sites in Rathen

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Hohenstaufen Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sambit Das (9 months ago)
I will highly recommend this. It has the best view points.
Jorge Sellare (12 months ago)
The location on googlemaps is WRONG. This place is NOT in Lohmen!
Yinji Zhao (14 months ago)
Rocks and great bridge
Bader alkandery (20 months ago)
Wonderful place, amazing views
T J LeRoy (2 years ago)
Quite amazing to think that there was such an amazing mountain top castle. Well worth the small price to enter
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