Sorrento Cathedral

Sorrento, Italy

Sorrento Cathedral, dedicated to Saints Philip and James, was first built around the 11th century and was rebuilt in the 15th century in Romanesque style. The cathedral bell tower has three storeys, and is decorated with a clock. The base of the bell tower dates to the time of the Roman Empire. The façade dates from 1924. The main doors are of the 11th century from Constantinople.

The interior, on a Latin cross floor plan, is divided into a nave and two side aisles. The nave contains round arches and paintings by the Nicola Malinconico. There are also paintings by Giacomo del Po. The marble altar and pulpit and the bishop's throne all date from the 16th century.

The poet Torquato Tasso, the best known citizen of the town, was baptized in the church's baptistery.

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Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Terra Mahre (2 years ago)
A beautiful city to stroll and linger at a cafe. Plenty of shopping as well as views of the water. Special inlaid mosiac furniture shops
Anthony Lay (2 years ago)
Such peace and calm. A joy to visit. Especially enjoyed the chapel for Saint John Paul II
Patricia Burke (2 years ago)
Beautiful Cathedral. Went to Mass Easter Sunday where all visitors were made to feel welcomed.
Ross Ojeda (2 years ago)
Beautiful setting overlooking the sea below and immersed next to a small garden and promenade. Beautiful interior and exterior conveys Italian Catholic Church feeling..
salvatore01 (2 years ago)
the most beautiful church in our city that hosts also some immigrants. This chathedral is dedicated to saint Filippo and Giacomo. There are many paints as you can see in the pictures (not mine). In the sides there are some statues of Jesus and some saints with also a picture of our pope saint Giovanni Paolo II that came in our city in about 1990. A very beautiful place to visit.
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