Amalfi Cathedral

Amalfi, Italy

Amalfi Cathedral is a 9th-century Roman Catholic cathedral in the Piazza del Duomo, Amalfi. It is dedicated to the Apostle Saint Andrew whose relics are kept here. The newer cathedral was built next to the older basilica that was built on the ruins of a previous temple. The remains of St. Andrew were reportedly brought to Amalfi from Constantinople in 1206 during the Fourth Crusade by Cardinal Peter of Capua. In 1208, the crypt was completed and the relics were turned over to the church. It said that later on manna issued from the saint's bones.

Architecture 

Predominantly of Arab-Norman Romanesque architectural style, the cathedral has been remodeled several times, adding Romanesque, Byzantine, Gothic, and Baroque elements. The cathedral includes the adjoining 9th-century Basilica of the Crucifix. Leading from the basilica are steps into the Crypt of St. Andrew.

The front facade was rebuilt in 1891 after the original one collapsed. It is of striped marble and stone with open arches that have lace detailing not commonly found in Italian sacred architecture while the tiled cupola is quite common amongst churches of the area.

Cast in Constantinople before 1066, and signed by Simeon of Syria, the cathedral's bronze doors are the earliest in Italy of post-Roman manufacture. Begun in 1180, and completed over 100 years later, the Romanesque style bell tower is off-center. The structure includes four small towers of Arab architectural type that are adorned with arches and are covered with majolica tiles. During times of war, the bell tower was purposed for defense. The garden contains colonnades, arches, and sculptures.

Interior

A wooden 13th century Crucifix hangs in the liturgical area. Another crucifix, made of mother-of-pearl, was brought from the Holy Land and is located to the right of the back door.

The High Altar in the central nave is formed from the sarcophagus of the Archbishop Pietro Capuano (died 1214). Above the altar is a painting by Andrea dell'Asta of The Martyrdom of St. Andrew. The boxed ceiling dates to 1702 and its artwork includes the Flagellation, the Crucifixion of the Apostle, and the Dell'Asta's 1710 Miracle of the Manna. The triumphal arch is held up by two Egyptian granite columns. There are two additional twisted columns and two pulpits that were part of the 12th century ambo. One of the pillars boasts a hidden column as an example of the ancient Romanesque structure.

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Details

Founded: 9th century AD
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

John Carey (2 years ago)
Beautiful cathedral with Byzantine and Muslim influences. Complex includes a cloister, museum and crypt. The church itself is ornare and distinctive. Well worth a visit.
Amarpreet Sran (2 years ago)
It’s a very beautiful and huge church in Amalfi.You are not allowed to take pictures here but everyone was doing it anyways.The roof is done very beautifully.You can take out some food or gelato and eat at the steps.
Ormy P. (2 years ago)
Surprisingly beautiful place hidden in the busy area. All exterior and interior is well preserved. Only 3 Euro for Entrance fee.
Daniela Botosaru (2 years ago)
I enjoyed visiting this cathedral. It is worth seeing it if you are passing by, especially that the entrance ticket is cheap. Good place to hide from the rain too.
Poseidónas Greek eline (2 years ago)
Cathedral of St. Andrew the First-Called. Stately structure. Interesting architecture. The area, the long and vertical stairs to the terrace of the temple all inspire respect. The atmosphere is imbued with spirit and spirit of important events of the times when the city was the capital. Would recommend this place.
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Architecture

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