Chiostro del Paradiso

Amalfi, Italy

The Chiostro del Paradiso ('Cloister of Paradise') was built by Filippo Augustariccio between 1266 and 1268 and was used as a burial ground for noble families of Amalfi. The white columns and pointed arches reflect the clear influence that the Arab world had on Amalfi, similar to those found in the courts of the palaces of the Middle East. It is a true open-air museum, with Roman and medieval pillars, sarcophagi depicting the wedding of Peleus and Thetis, the other the rape of Proserpina, a fourteenth-century sarcophagus and fragments of the façade of the Duomo.

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Details

Founded: 1266
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Muhammad Usman Siddiqui (2 years ago)
Beautiful
Chiara Busca (chiagger) (2 years ago)
Seems nice only from the outside because i haven’t paid to get in, also dont give money to the church
Krypton Techies (3 years ago)
Good museum and cloister but Italy has much better artefacts elsewhere. 3 Euro ticket.
Aryan Sachin Gupta (3 years ago)
Good museum and cloister but Italy has much better artefacts elsewhere. 3 Euro ticket.
Daniela Botosaru (3 years ago)
Interesting to see if you’re around.
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