San Giacomo Monastery

Capri, Italy

Certosa di San Giacomo is a Carthusian monastery on the island of Capri. Count Giacomo Arcucci, a secretary to Joan I of Naples, established the charterhouse in 1371. He later became a monk himself in 1386. In 1553 the monastery was restored and fortified and a tower was erected which collapsed in the 18th century.

There was often conflict between the islanders and the monks, who owned land as well as grazing and hunting rights. During the 1656 plague in Capri, the monks sealed themselves off, whereupon the islanders threw their corpses over the wall of the monastery in retribution.

Since 1974 the charterhouse houses the Karl Wilhelm Diefenbach museum among others and is used for cultural events. A high school is also on the premises.

The charterhouse has three main areas: the pharmacy and women's church, the buildings for monks, and those for guests. The cloister (Chiostro Grande) is of a late Renaissance design, while the Chiostro Piccolo features Roman marble columns.

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Address

Via Certosa 15, Capri, Italy
See all sites in Capri

Details

Founded: 1371
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paolo Cosenza (3 years ago)
Wonderful
Chronicle (3 years ago)
Very beautiful charter house .... unforgettable journey
Carmine Colacino (4 years ago)
Great place
Daphna k (4 years ago)
A hidden beautiful monastery and gardens at last no so many tourists.
Ron Bruinen (5 years ago)
Beautiful hidden treasure. No information or brochure in English, no friendly people. But if you like (old) architecture, you'll love it
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