Cumae was an ancient city of Magna Graecia on the coast of the Tyrrhenian Sea. Founded by settlers from Euboea in the 8th century BC, Cumae was the first Greek colony on the mainland of Italy and the seat of the Cumaean Sibyl. It spread its influence throughout the area over the 7th and 6th centuries BC, gaining sway over Puteoli and Misenum and, thereafter, founding Neapolis (Naples) in 470 BC.

The Greek period at Cumae came to an end in 421 BC, when the Oscans broke down the walls and took the city, ravaging the countryside. Some survivors fled to Neapolis. Cumae came under Roman rule with Capua and in 338 was granted partial citizenship, a civitas sine suffragio. In the Second Punic War, in spite of temptations to revolt from Roman authority, Cumae withstood Hannibal's siege.

The early presence of Christianity in Cumae is shown by the 2nd-century work The Shepherd of Hermas, in which the author tells of a vision of a woman, identified with the church, who entrusts him with a text to read to the presbyters of the community in Cuma. At the end of the 4th century, the temple of Zeus at Cumae was transformed into a Christian basilica.

Under Roman rule, 'quiet Cumae' slumbered until the disasters of the Gothic Wars (535–554), when it was repeatedly attacked, as the only fortified city in Campania aside from Neapolis: Belisarius took it in 536, Totila held it, and when Narses gained possession of Cumae, he found he had won the whole treasury of the Goths. In 1207, forces from Naples, acting for the boy-King of Sicily, destroyed the city and its walls, as the stronghold of a nest of bandits.

The seaward side of the large rise on which Cumae was built was used as a bunker and gun emplacement by the Germans during World War II.

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Founded: 8th century BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Veronika Ženíšková (12 months ago)
Nice place to see, interesting, nice view and not that many tourists
Daniel Carrigan (12 months ago)
Interesting place to visit staff were nice. Parking outside looked safe
Michele Prisco (2 years ago)
Very well maintained site with lots of history immersed in nature. Fantastic view of the Phlegraean Fields and very peaceful. Highly recommended.
Mark Gibbs (2 years ago)
Really loved this place as it has so many unique features I've never seen before. Important ancient Greek site. There are three levels and walk is quite easy. Especially notable are the long, eerie Temple of the Sibyl and the ruins of two Greek temples, one to Apollo and one to Zeus.
James Shoemark (2 years ago)
Wow, what an awesome surprise. Really loved this place as it has so many unique features I've never seen before. It was lovely and quite - no noise, only a few people and lots of shade from olive trees. Could have spent the whole day here as the site is massive and significant in Greek/Roman history. Only negative point is there was no food available on site, so be sure to bring a few sandwiches with you.
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