Royal Palace of Naples

Naples, Italy

Royal Palace of Naples was one of the four residences near Naples used by the Bourbon Kings during their rule of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies (1734-1860): the others were the palaces of Caserta, Capodimonte overlooking Naples, and the third Portici, on the slopes of Vesuvius.

Construction on the present building was begun in the 17th century by the architect Domenico Fontana. Intended to house the King Philip III of Spain on a visit never fulfilled to this part of his kingdom, instead it initially housed the Viceroy Fernando Ruiz de Castro, count of Lemos. By 1616, the facade had been completed, and by 1620, the interior was frescoed by Battistello Caracciolo, Giovanni Balducci, and Belisario Corenzio. The decoration of the Royal Chapel of Assumption was not completed until 1644 by Antonio Picchiatti.

In 1734, with the arrival of Charles III of Spain to Naples, the palace became the royal residence of the Bourbons. On the occasion of his marriage to Maria Amalia of Saxony in 1738, Francesco De Mura and Domenico Antonio Vaccaro helped remodel the interior. Further modernization took place under Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies. In 1768, on the occasion of his marriage to Maria Carolina of Austria, under the direction of Ferdinando Fuga, the great hall was rebuilt and the court theater added. During the second half of the 18th century, a 'new wing' was added, which in 1927 became the Vittorio Emanuele III National Library. By the 18th century, the royal residence was moved to Reggia of Caserta, as that inland town was more defensible from naval assault, as well as more distant from the often-rebellious populace of Naples.

During the Napoleonic occupation the palace was enriched by Joachim Murat and his wife, Caroline Bonaparte, with Neoclassic decorations and furnishings. However, a fire in 1837 damaged many rooms, and required restoration from 1838 to 1858 under the direction of Gaetano Genovese. Further additions of a Party Wing and a Belvedere were made in this period. At the corner of the palace with San Carlo Theatre, a new facade was created that obscured the viceroyal palace of Pedro de Toledo.

In 1922, it was decided to transfer here the contents of the National Library. The transfer of library collections was made by 1925.

The library suffered from bombing during World War II and the subsequent military occupation of the building caused serious damage. Today, the palace and adjacent grounds house the famous Teatro San Carlo, the smaller Teatrino di Corte (recently restored), the Biblioteca Nazionale Vittorio Emanuele III, a museum, and offices, including those of the regional tourist board.

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Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

nadia minniti (31 days ago)
Built in the 1600s and completed in the 1700s, this majestic royal palace is astonishing. The original furniture is exquisite and the tapestries out of this world. Don't miss the ceiling frescos and the gold leaf doors. The public bathroom is located upstairs. No toilet paper available.
Subba Nayak (50 days ago)
Another amazing architectural work!!! Napoli is amazing with such incredible architecture everywhere you go. A must visit. The adjoining garden is lovely too
Santiago Juan Alberto fijma (54 days ago)
The place was very clean , no too much people. The tickets were €10,- without a reduction which is possible if you’re within a certain age. They had audio tours and in almost every room there is an employee to guide / keep an eye on things. The gardens were very beautiful and nice to walk through , de nation library was closed but the experience all together was amazing
Maria Mousi (5 months ago)
Beautiful Palace, every room has its own pieces of incredible art that you can see. Very well looked after and reasonable ticket price. Loved it!❤
L Cordery (6 months ago)
Definitely worth a visit, the grand staircase is amazing and there are many rooms to visit including the theatre and state rooms. The view from the high gardens is fantastic and has a great view of the port and Vesuvius. The guided tour was only in Italian but they had audio guides available in English.
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