Teatro di San Carlo

Naples, Italy

The Real Teatro di San Carlo (Royal Theatre of Saint Charles) is located adjacent to the central Piazza del Plebiscito, and connected to the Royal Palace. It is the oldest continuously active venue for public opera in the world, opening in 1737, decades before both the Milan's La Scala and Venice's La Fenice theatres. The construction was ordered by Bourbon King Charles III of Naples. Given its size, structure and antiquity, it was the model for theatres that were later built in Europe.

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    Founded: 1737
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    Rating

    4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Alex S. (15 months ago)
    Wonderful honourable Theatre from the 18th century. A highlight! But don't book the 2nd row in the balconies, you will have a much better view in the first row (especially close to the stage)
    Christopher Hackl (15 months ago)
    Great historic theater. Luck fantastic from inside!
    Charles Hammerstein (15 months ago)
    Best and oldest opera house in the world. Well staffed, polite and not overly formal.
    Rita Brazienė (16 months ago)
    Great. Magnificent. The theatre is so impressive, that it just leaves without breath. So worth to get in one of nice balconies and enjoy spectacular opera.
    Alice Venessa Bever (17 months ago)
    Pure magic. Regardless of the opera, visit this place if you to be transported back in time of lavish decor and impeccable arias. Breathtaking.
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