Piscina Mirabilis

Bacoli, Italy

The Piscina Mirabilis was a freshwater cistern on the Bacoli cliff at the western end of the Gulf of Naples. One of the largest freshwater cisterns built by the ancient Romans, it was situated there in order to provide the Roman western imperial fleet at Portus Julius with drinking water.

The cistern was dug entirely out of the tuff cliff face and was 15 metres high, 72 metres long, and 25 metres wide. It was supported by vaulted ceilings and a total of 48 pillars. It was supplied with water from the main Roman aqueduct, the Aqua Augusta, which brought water from sources in Serino near Avellino, 100 kilometres distant, to Naples.

The ancient cistern is currently in private hands, but parts of it may still be visited by the public.

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Details

Founded: 27 BCE - 14 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tony Coppola (14 months ago)
Very poor in updating opening times. Place states its open but it is shut and you have to book by phone if you want to visit.
Dilruk Hiran (15 months ago)
Its very hard to enter the place,you have to contact a lady she only have the keys to this place, but worth it to visit
David Bamberger (18 months ago)
Despite saying it was open (on Google Maps) we arrived there to find it closed and only open by pre-booking (see attached photo).
Vicente Gracia (2 years ago)
A water deposit from Romans period. To find it is a little adventure and to finally enter too. You need to phone to a cell number indicated at the entrance. The person doesn't speak English and we need to phone her sec fetal Tim new because the was a bad signal coverage?. Explanations in Italian many times interrupted by new incoming visitors.
Bruna Gualano (3 years ago)
It's a beautiful swimming pools with lots of games. Excellent for children and families. I just love that very big swimming pool.
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