Château de Brax

Brax, France

Château de Brax was originally constructed in the 13th century, but there were alterations and additions in the 16th and 18th centuries. The structure is enclosed by four circular towers. The rear façade incorporates the grand staircase. The brick walls are crenellated. The front opens onto parkland; access is by a double staircase. A round walk carried on machicolations formed of brick corbels and blind arcades circles the whole building.

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Address

D24C 2, Brax, France
See all sites in Brax

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Catherine Brunetta (18 months ago)
Je reviens toujours avec plaisir dans le village de mon enfance!!
Isabelle KNORST (18 months ago)
Ce château n est pas visitable par ce qu occupé par un organisme médical semble t il ! Ne pas faire le chemin juste pour voir une façade derrière une grille !
montagut yves (19 months ago)
Magnifique petit château vos rêves d'enfant vont remonter
Pyrénéa (21 months ago)
Seulement vue de l'extérieur
Raul Santiago Almunia (2 years ago)
Castillo Renacentista, hoy día privado pero su acceso está prohibido por ser su uso un hospital psiquiátrico. Así que ni siquiera podemos acercanos a el, las pocas fotos que se pueden tomar sería a través de la valla.
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