Musée des Augustins

Toulouse, France

The Musée des Augustins is a fine arts museum in Toulouse which conserves a collection of sculpture and paintings from the Middle Ages to the early 20th century. The paintings are from throughout France, the sculptures representing Occitan culture of the region with a particularly rich assemblage of Romanesque sculpture.

The building in which the museum is sited was built in 1309 in the Gothic style and prior to the French Revolution housed Toulouse's Augustinian convent. The convent was secularized in 1793 and first opened to the public as a museum in 1795, making it one of the oldest museums in France after the Louvre.

The French schools of the 15th to 18th centuries are represented in the painting collection by Philippe de Champaigne, Louise Moillon, Valentin de Boulogne, Sébastien Bourdon etc, as well as painters from Toulouse and its region, such as Nicolas Tournier. Many French 19th- and 20th-century painting are also represented, with works by Toulouse-Lautrec, Ingres, Delacroix and Manet. The painting collection also includes works by Spanish, Dutch and Italian artists. The Italian holdings span from the 14th to the 18th century with works by Neri di Bicci, Lorenzo Monaco, Pietro Perugino, Jacopo Zucchi, Guido Reni, Guercino, Bernardo Strozzi, Baciccio, Carlo Maratta, Crespi, Francesco Solimena, Guardi. Flemish and Dutch painting is represented with paintings by Cornelis van Haarlem, Rubens, Anthony van Dyck, Jacob Jordaens, Jan van Goyen, Aelbert Cuyp, Pieter Coecke van Aelst and Cornelis van Poelenburgh while for Spain the museum notably displays one painting by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo.

The museum's sculpture collection is in large part due to the rescue activities of antiquaries and museum curators such as Alexandre du Mège who managed to extricate sculpture from the frequent destruction of religious buildings that marked the 19th century. It is particularly strong in 12th-century Romanesque sculpture from the city's three main religious buildings - the priory of Notre-Dame de la Daurade, the basilica of Saint-Sernin and the cathedral of Saint-Étienne. It also includes many 14th and 15th century locally-produced sculptures and eight 16th century terracotta figures from the chapelle de Rieux, built around 1340 in the couvent des Cordeliers, as well as gargoyles from the same convent. It also houses 19th century sculpture, with plaster works by Alexandre Falguière and his pupil Antonin Mercié, as well as works by Rodin and a bronze by Camille Claudel.

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Details

Founded: 1795
Category: Museums in France

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Julien Coullet (2 years ago)
Great architecture, lovely garden, nice artwork, and to one exception, staff was nice. Affordable but be advised, it is not toddler-friendly and not disabled-friendly. Audio guide is recommended if you're not fluent in French.
xixi ZHOU (2 years ago)
To cold to visit it in winter. The yard is not yet ready for people. But inside the sculpture and paintings are not bad
Cynthia Valenzuela (2 years ago)
Really beautiful and informative. It was more than I expected. Just as recommendation the information related to the audiogide and orientation paper was a bit disorganized and it took me time looking to which artworks they were talking about. Besides that, excellent museum
Maria Jimenez (2 years ago)
Although it was on works and there were some exhibit rooms closed.. It was worth and a great experience
Von (2 years ago)
Its a good place to visit on a Sunday afternoon. It’s a museum. Lots of nice statues to view. Religious themed. Nice big painting as well.
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