Notre-Dame de la Daurade

Toulouse, France

Notre-Dame de la Daurade was established in 410 when Emperor Honorius allowed the conversion of Pagan temples to Christianity. The original building of Notre-Dame de la Daurade was a temple dedicated to Apollo. During the 6th century a church was erected, decorated with golden mosaics; the current name derives from the antique name, Deaurata, (Latin aura, gold). It became a Benedictine monastery during the 9th century. After a period of decline starting in the 15th century, the basilica was demolished in 1761 to make way for the construction of Toulouse's riverside quays. The buildings were restored and a new church built, but the monastery was closed during the French Revolution, becoming a tobacco factory. The current edifice was built during the 19th century.

The basilica had housed the shrine of a Black Madonna. The original icon was stolen in the fifteenth century, and its first replacement was burned by Revolutionaries in 1799 on the Place du Capitole. The icon presented today is an 1807 copy of the fifteenth century Madonna. Blackened by the hosts of candles, the second Madonna has been known since the sixteenth century as Notre Dame La Noire.

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Details

Founded: 1764
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Μαριάννα Μητσιώνη (8 months ago)
360 view of the city
David Jenkins (8 months ago)
Being plonked in a city with so many other interesting churches makes life hard for this one.
Greg (2 years ago)
Beautiful church since the renovation is done
Dirk Lubrich (3 years ago)
Interesting church, defintivly worth a visit when you are inToulouse and touring the city :)
Erin Morris (3 years ago)
We only randomly popped in here for a look but it’s quite a building, inside there’s renovations underway so there’s a screen painted to look at if the far end of the church is visible and in the low light at first I was fooled into thinking this was the real thing. The building certainly has a lot of atmosphere, there was a service about to start so we didn’t go beyond the entry way but I’m sure on other occasions it’s worth a wander around.
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