Notre-Dame de la Daurade

Toulouse, France

Notre-Dame de la Daurade was established in 410 when Emperor Honorius allowed the conversion of Pagan temples to Christianity. The original building of Notre-Dame de la Daurade was a temple dedicated to Apollo. During the 6th century a church was erected, decorated with golden mosaics; the current name derives from the antique name, Deaurata, (Latin aura, gold). It became a Benedictine monastery during the 9th century. After a period of decline starting in the 15th century, the basilica was demolished in 1761 to make way for the construction of Toulouse's riverside quays. The buildings were restored and a new church built, but the monastery was closed during the French Revolution, becoming a tobacco factory. The current edifice was built during the 19th century.

The basilica had housed the shrine of a Black Madonna. The original icon was stolen in the fifteenth century, and its first replacement was burned by Revolutionaries in 1799 on the Place du Capitole. The icon presented today is an 1807 copy of the fifteenth century Madonna. Blackened by the hosts of candles, the second Madonna has been known since the sixteenth century as Notre Dame La Noire.

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Details

Founded: 1764
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dylan Cam (2 years ago)
Wow!
Sara Vendrell (2 years ago)
It's really a beautiful place, specially if you check out its view. It has an incredible location right on the river bank, overlooking the Toulouse landscape and most of its landmarks. Check it out!
Aksorn Khane (2 years ago)
Very nice place
Nils Gradwanderer (3 years ago)
Beautiful building, but inside isn't that beatyful.
David Maddison (4 years ago)
A lovely attraction and good to see that this church is in the process of being restored. The vantage point in front of the church is perfect for watching the sunset on the other side of the river
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