Château de Laréole

Laréole, France

Château de Laréole was built in 1579 by Pierre de Cheverry, a son of a great pastel merchant. The construction of the castle lasted three years and the Cheverry family kept the castle until 1707. After the Great Revolution, the castle changes hands several times before it was abandoned in1922. In 1984 the General Council of Haute-Garonne bought the property and restored it. Today the site is open to the public and guided tours are available.

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Address

Village 50, Laréole, France
See all sites in Laréole

Details

Founded: 1579
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

User Reviews

JP Nacif Drah (3 months ago)
Cute “castle”. The place is nice but relatively small, more so when you compare it with other castles around. When we went, there was a concert going on in the courtyard, so we had a lot of fun. Watch for activities going on to time it right. The art inside was ok. Nothing special.
Mary Leader (5 months ago)
Castle and tea room shut on Saturday afternoon but great place to look around.
Tom Roberts (11 months ago)
Excellent restoration. Entertaining art exhibit. Beautiful, relaxing grounds. Fun coffee shop.
fran walker (12 months ago)
Lovely place to visit. Beautiful setting.
Emilie Descorne (15 months ago)
Really nice park/gardens and building. Inside is empty but free to visit.
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