Château de Rudelle

Muret, France

The Château de Rudelle is a 16th and 17th century castle in the commune of Muret. The castle is noted for its ancient chimneys and for murals painted on the third floor.

It was built by Guillaume de Rudelle, the son of Jean de Rudelle, a counsellor to the king. In 1783, Jean-Marie-Joseph Ingres, the father of the famous artist Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, stayed there and painted several ceilings. At the French Revolution, the property was taken as a national asset and sold at auction.

The building today has a reactangular plan within square towers at each corner. On the south, a square tower projects slightly. On the top floor, immediately below the roof, is a series of arcades on the north and south façades. Mullioned windows decorate the façade. The upper floors are reached by a wooden spiral staircase.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Antoine SoyoKase (12 months ago)
Très belle adresse mais malheureusement je n'ai pas eu assez d'eau chaude pour me rincer
alexandra Fabredelmas (13 months ago)
Un peu rustique mais bon accueil et très propre
Chris Doudet (15 months ago)
Déco un peu vieillot à mon goût mais qui n'enlève rien à la qualité de l'établissement. Petit dej exclusivement français.
Veronique Le Borgne (2 years ago)
2 mariages en 2 ans...dommage que nos amis n'aient que 2 filles. Nous y reviendrons avec plaisir. Bonne continuation.
Irwin FournierPro (2 years ago)
Vert nice and peaceful hotel located in Muret, little town within 20mn drive from Toulouse. The mansion is situated in à beautifull Park, rooms are finely decorated, great owners, good deal Indeed
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kromeriz Castle and Gardens

Kroměříž stands on the site of an earlier ford across the River Morava. The gardens and castle of Kroměříž are an exceptionally complete and well-preserved example of a European Baroque princely residence and its gardens and described as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The first residence on the site was founded by bishop Stanislas Thurzo in 1497. The building was in a Late Gothic style, with a modicum of Renaissance detail. During the Thirty Years' War, the castle was sacked by the Swedish army (1643).

It was not until 1664 that a bishop from the powerful Liechtenstein family charged architect Filiberto Lucchese with renovating the palace in a Baroque style. The chief monument of Lucchese's work in Kroměříž is the Pleasure Garden in front of the castle. Upon Lucchese's death in 1666, Giovanni Pietro Tencalla completed his work on the formal garden and had the palace rebuilt in a style reminiscent of the Turinese school to which he belonged.

After the castle was gutted by a major fire in March 1752, Bishop Hamilton commissioned two leading imperial artists, Franz Anton Maulbertsch and Josef Stern, arrived at the residence in order to decorate the halls of the palace with their works. In addition to their paintings, the palace still houses an art collection, generally considered the second finest in the country, which includes Titian's last mythological painting, The Flaying of Marsyas. The largest part of the collection was acquired by Bishop Karel in Cologne in 1673. The palace also contains an outstanding musical archive and a library of 33,000 volumes.

UNESCO lists the palace and garden among the World Heritage Sites. As the nomination dossier explains, 'the castle is a good but not outstanding example of a type of aristocratic or princely residence that has survived widely in Europe. The Pleasure Garden, by contrast, is a very rare and largely intact example of a Baroque garden'. Apart from the formal parterres there is also a less formal nineteenth-century English garden, which sustained damage during floods in 1997.

Interiors of the palace were extensively used by Miloš Forman as a stand-in for Vienna's Hofburg Imperial Palace during filming of Amadeus (1984), based on the life of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, who actually never visited Kroměříž. The main audience chamber was also used in the film Immortal Beloved (1994), in the piano concerto scene.