La Clarté-Dieu Abbey

Eaunes, France

The Abbey of La Clarté-Dieu was a Cistercian monastery. The abbey was founded in 1239 by the executors of Peter des Roches, Bishop of Winchester, as one of a pair, the other being Netley Abbey in Hampshire, England. The bishop had conceived the idea of founding a pair of monasteries some years before and had begun collecting the necessary endowments for them, but his death in 1238 prevented him from completing the project. The first monks arrived at the site in 1240.

The abbey was severely damaged in the course of the Hundred Years War and the cost of rebuilding proved a heavy burden on the finances of the community. Nevertheless, La Clarté-Dieu managed to survive until the French Revolution when it was closed and sold off along with all the other monasteries of France. Following the revolution the abbey was for a long time used as a farm and some of the buildings were allowed to fall to ruin. Despite this, much of the mediaeval abbey remains in excellent condition along with some fine post-mediaeval additions. The abbey is preserved as an historic monument and is open to the public.

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Details

Founded: 1239
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Annie Thenezay (2 years ago)
She asks to be treated but it comes gradually
Aline OLIVIER (2 years ago)
Very nice park .. Super nice ..
Nathan MORGE (2 years ago)
Very nice place
Sophie RouvS (3 years ago)
Very nice little park with trees very nice presence of picnic table and games for children
Alice Soriano (3 years ago)
Wonderful place . Absolute calm relaxing Ma that 2/3 games for children
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