The present structure of Crom Castle was built in 1820 and, although Queen Victoria's reign began in 1837, the building was built in the Victorian style and has since been the home to the Creighton (later Crichton) family, Earls of Erne.

Crom Estate also contains the ruins of the Old Castle, a tower house, which was previously owned by the Balfour family until the Creightons acquired it in 1609.

The castle is privately owned by the Creighton family, Earls of Erne, and the estate is managed by the National Trust.

The estate includes many features of times past including the old farmyard and visitors centre, The boathouse, once the home of Lough Erne Yacht Club, the tea house, the church, schoolhouse, etc. Guests are able to use the west wing for weddings, or to stay in the West Wing of Crom Castle on weekly or long weekend basis.

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Founded: 1820
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Brian Boyd (8 months ago)
A hidden gem. Well worth a visit. Nice visitor centre. Great walks. Ruins of the castle. On the lake and surrounding waterways are full of wildlife. Lots to see.
E K (9 months ago)
I like to walk over there, especially on good weather
Marty Magill (9 months ago)
Beautiful, peaceful. Great place to unwind, slow down and enjoy nature.
BARRY Mears (11 months ago)
My son's wedding reception here, fantastic venue and Lord Urn a delightful host.
Stanislav Vrabec (16 months ago)
Ideal place for easy nature walk suitable for all ages. Can't wait for summer to have picnic on the green and hire the boat.Kids loved navigating using the map given at the reception.
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