The first Enniskillen castle was built on this site by Hugh Macguire in 1428. It featured greatly in Irish rebellions against English rule in the 16th century and was taken after an eight-day siege in 1594. Captain William Cole remodelled and refurbished the castle adding the riverside tower at the south, known as the Watergate, in 1609.

The castle was remodelled as “Castle Barracks” as part of the response to a threat of a French invasion in 1796. Castle Barracks became the home of the 27th Regiment of Foot in 1853. The barracks continued to be used by other regiments and, from November 1939, they became to home of the North Irish Horse, a Territorial Army unit.

The barracks were decommissioned in 1950 and were converted for use as council depot. The castle was subsequently opened to the public as a heritage centre.

The castle consists of two sections, a central tower keep and a curtain wall which was strengthened with small turrets called Bartizans. The design of the castle has strong Scottish influences. This can be particularly seen in the Watergate, which features two corbelled circular tourelles which were built about 1609.

The castle is now home to the Fermanagh County Museum, which focuses on the county's history, culture and natural history. Exhibits include the area's prehistory, natural history, traditional rural life, local crafts and Belleek Pottery, and history of the castle. It also contains information on the Maguire family. The castle also houses the Inniskillings Museum, which is the regimental museum of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers and the 5th Royal Inniskilling Dragoon Guards.

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Founded: 1428
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Natalie Waterson (2 years ago)
Had a great time at continental Market, was lovely having it at castle really nice atmosphere.
Carol Wise (2 years ago)
The continental market was fabulous, so much food choices. The artisan craft stores were wonderful. The plant and flower stall exceptional.
Kira Estrada (2 years ago)
It is a very interesting museum to visit. The favilities were nice and the coffee from their coffee shop was delicious. Staff was also very nice and helpful at all the times.
Baking Bar (2 years ago)
A great day for exploring some our our local history and the history for the Royal Enniskilling Fusiliers. There are numerous exhibits within the castle so there is a bit of history for everyone. Regimental shop also on site.
jayne thomas (2 years ago)
Is a great place to visit and in a beautiful location as well looking over lough Erin The castle shows old war things within My favourite part is there’s a little seating area inside and has a projector showing visitors all of Ireland video with Celtic music playing There is also a place at front desk to ask for maps and information and a shop to buy souvenirs And at the back they have a cute Little Cafe where you can purchase Tea coffee juice sandwiches cakes and other things as well so it’s a very lovely place to visit
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