Château de Saint-Béat

Saint-Béat, France

Château de Saint-Béat dates from the 12th century. It was enlarged by Henri IV (1553 – 1610). Rulers rarely lived in Saint-Béat; the castle was occupied by captains until the 16th century. In 1588, the Parlement of Toulouse passed a law that required the inhabitants of Melles, Argut and Arlos by turns to guard the castle, subject to a fine of 500 écus. The castle never had to repel invasions, though its strategic position close to the Spanish border led to it being described as 'la clef de France' (the key to France).

The castle was surrounded by two enceintes. The keep measures 5m square and had two storeys. The castle provides views over the village and the Garonne valley.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Babette Pinto (21 months ago)
Cet endroit est tout simplement super.les propriétaires sont aux petits soins, l accueil est chaleureux, le repas du soir très copieux et délicieux, pareil pour le petit déjeuner. À refaire.
Jesse Postma (2 years ago)
Beste vakantieplek ooit!! ook de activiteiten met Stefan zijn geweldig
Bernard Desjardins (2 years ago)
Un endroit où l'accueil est formidable, un personnel répondant avec spontanéité et avec courtoisie à vos besoins. La notion de qualité et de satisfaire au mieux prime. Très appréciable et de quoi satisfaire les gourmets. Adresse à retenir
Harrie Hoogeveen (2 years ago)
Beautifull place
Alan Browse (5 years ago)
Small, friendly family-run hotel. Good home cooking. Great location. Have stayed here several times and will be back again!
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