Saint-Bertrand-de-Comminges Cathedral

Saint-Bertrand-de-Comminges, France

Saint-Bertrand-de-Comminges Cathedral was originally built in the 12th century in Romanesque style. Over the northern and southern walls there are still Romanesque arches, the floor is made of marble and includes some tombs and sepulchurs. The cloister is also clearly Romanesque and offers an impressive view over the entire valley.

The Gothic part is built in the Meridional Gothic style. There is a single nave that is 55m long, 16m wide and 28m high. Over the arrow arches there are the coats of arms of the founding bishops. The stained glass windows are impressive with their intricate details, almost comparable to those of Auch.

The stalls within the choir were commissioned by Jean de Mauléon but because of the lack of documents it is impossible to name the artist that made them, although, by comparison with other stalls, these are often considered to be the work of Nicolas Bachelier, or rather, of his school which had been using artists from France, Spain and Italy. Most of the work was done in oak and walnut tree, and the choir seems to be separate from the rest of the church in that it contrasts so much with the Gothic and Romanesque parts.

The sixty-seven stalls represent characters from both the Old and the New Testaments.

Bizarrely, there is a stuffed crocodile inside the cathedral. This fact, as well as a general description of the cathedral itself and details of its history, features prominently in Canon Alberic's Scrap-Book, a ghost story by M. R. James.

The former cathedral has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site as part of the World Heritage Sites of the Routes of Santiago de Compostela in France.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

The Solicitor Group (2 years ago)
Get little spot for a coffee and crêpe
fydeisienne69 (2 years ago)
Quel beau monument... Les siècles sont passés sur cette vieille dame mais elle est toujours aussi magnifique... Ne pas hésiter à payer la visite car cela en vaut largement le coup...
Profelectro Emeritus (2 years ago)
Ok
Peter Ronge (2 years ago)
This cathedral is totally anomalous because it is a huge structure in a small, beautifully situated village. With Romanesque, Gothic and Renaissance elements, it seems an unlikely survivor over centuries of turmoil in the region. This treasure is not far from the automotive from Tarbes to Toulouse and has not been overrun by tourism. We went in April on a local recommendation and hope future visitors enjoy discovering the cathedral's many treasures for yourselves.
Rita Nativi (2 years ago)
Meraviglioso complesso. Da visitare assolutamente. Rimane rialzato rispetto alla strada in una posizione stupenda. C'è una navetta che porta alla chiesa in pochissimo tempo e molto frequentemente. Un
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