Château de Mauvezin

Mauvezin, France

Château de Mauvezin, occupied since protohistory, was transformed into a castrum in the Middle Ages and later into a castle. The castle was built by Gaston Fébus (also Phoebus) around 1380. Following the merging of Bigorre into the Kingdom of France in 1607, it fell into disuse and was dismantled piece by piece, its stones being used for other buildings.

Today the castle is being restored and houses a historical and folk museum of Bearn and Bigorre.

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Details

Founded: 1380
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

you who (8 months ago)
Great spot for a picnic with great views and fresh air, there's even a few goats hanging around to keep the children amused.
Brian Skellie (12 months ago)
Wow! What a treasure of history well demonstrated by the guide in period costume! We enjoyed the medieval animations, music and spectacle enthusiastically. The picnic area has breathtaking mountain and valley views. Fun in family!
Boris Modylevsky (12 months ago)
Chateaux de Mavezin is a well preserved castle with a properly organized exhibition that shows medieval life.
Saara Sälpäkivi (13 months ago)
Happened upon this great castle by accident while on a roadtrip. It was well worth the visit since it was beautifully restored and the views were fantastic.
Musa Mailula (2 years ago)
It was an amazing tour of the castle from the medivial period. The castle and the historical ornaments and weapons are well preserved. Parking is available and it's free. The town is in a crime free zone, so no worries about being mugged. There's a souvenir shop inside the castle and the lady that works inside the shops speaks both French and English. The place is not full, you get to take your time observing the displays.
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