Bayonne Cathedral

Bayonne, France

The Cathedral of Saint Mary of Bayonne is the seat of the former Bishops of Bayonne, now the Bishops of Bayonne, Lescar, and Oloron. The cathedral is in the Gothic architectural tradition.

The site was previously occupied by a Romanesque cathedral that was destroyed by two fires in 1258 and 1310. Construction of the present cathedral began in the 13th century and was completed at the beginning of the 17th, except for the two spires which were not finished until the 19th century. The structure has been much restored and refurbished, notably by Émile Boeswildwald, architect to the French government in the 19th century, and a pupil of Eugène Viollet-le-Duc.

The cathedral stands on the Pilgrimage Way of Santiago de Compostela.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Paulo Henrique (15 months ago)
Fantastic chappels polychrome a visiter absolutely. Also have look outside on the top entrance and discover the Pietà, the Virgin with Christ in her arms. Very unsual but splendid to see this detail.
sergioqueber07 (16 months ago)
Impressive cathedral although if you want to see the inside you better be there before 6:30 pm
Alex Bechtle (16 months ago)
Beautiful little cathedral in the middle of bayonne
Joe Rice (21 months ago)
Truly the Notre Dame de Bayonne! The church is massive and very old with an interior that is well taken care of and preserved. Located on a hill it also allows for some pretty good views of the rest of Bayonne.
Chris Gray (2 years ago)
Was a bit if a wait for food, slow service but amazing crepes! A popular spot next to the cathedral. Be sure to check it out as it's just next door and worth a visit. Overall recommend but would it pay to reserve a tablet in the busy summer period. The staff do speak Spanish and English also.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.