Sitting in the highest point of Petit Bayonne you will find the  Château-Neuf (“new castle”) built in the 15th century by Charles IV. This massive building now belongs to the university and is unfortunately closed to the public.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

3.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lucie Geneviève (21 months ago)
Petite résidence en plein centre de Bayonne, très agréable commerces à proximité et également un parking. La chambre n'est pas très grande mais très correcte avec une très belle salle de bain et un petit coin cuisine avec placard à l'entrée. Dommage pour l'emplacement tv il faudrais un meuble un peu plus grand et surtout plus haut.
Jérôme Blondel (2 years ago)
Perfect good price
Michela Asunis (2 years ago)
ATTENTION TO WHOEVER WANTS TO CHECK IN AFTER 18. Unfortunately I have to put one star to review, if I could I would take starts away instead. We asked if we could check-in late before making the reservation, they said was not a problem as they had a procedure for it. We called them again on the day of the check-in. All fine. They were supposed to leave us the keys in a safe box. Apparently they had the brilliant idea to give the codes to several guests, one of which took our key as well. We arrived at 23.30, emergency numbers works only till 22.30, so if something happens to you at 22.31 is your problem. We tried to contact them for a while, no answer, at 2am we had to look for another accommodation. The next day nobody ever called us to apologise or to explain us what happened. How do we know? We had to call them. Several times. We even had to ask for the refund, like if it wasn't obvious. REMINDER FOR THE STAFF OF THE HOTEL: Problems do happen, you need to be good to come out of it somehow. You are NOT since you did ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to at least apologise. RIDICULOUS.
André Pais (2 years ago)
A hotel that leaves you 2,5 hours standing outside without keys and no way of reaching the management is a place that doesn't deserve even a star. A hotel that doesn't call you after to apologize having ruined your day shouldn't be a hotel. I dont know how the hotel is inside, but from their customer service and the way they handled our problem it shouldn't deserve any guests. It was the most horrible experience with hotels we ever had.
jeremie lecomte (3 years ago)
Realy bad internet
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The St Sophia's Cathedral was built between 1045-1050 inside the Novgorod Kremlin (fortress). It is one of the earliest stone structures of northern Russia. Its height is 38 m. Originally it was taller, for during the past nine centuries the lower part of the building became concealed by the two-metre thick cultural layer. The cathedral was built by Prince Vladimir, the son of Yaroslav the Wise, and until the 1130s this principal church of the city also served as the sepulchre of Novgorodian princes. For the Novgorodians, St Sophia became synonymous with their town, the symbol of civic power and independence.

The five-domed church looks simpler but no less impressive than its prototype, the thirteen-domed St Sophia of Kiev. The cathedral exterior is striking in its majesty and epic splendour evoking the memories of Novgorod's glorious past and invincible might. In the 11th century it looked more imposing than now. Its facade represented a gigantic mosaic of huge, coarsely trimmed irregular slabs of flagstone and shell rock. In some places (particularly on the apses), the wall was covered with mortar, smoothly polished, drawn up to imitate courses of brick or of whitestone slabs, and slightly coloured. As a result, the facade was not white, as it is today, but multicoloured. The play of stone, decorative painting and the building materials of various texture enhanced the impression of austere simplicity and introduced a picturesque effect.

The two-storied galleries extend along the building's southern, western and northern sides, with a stair-tower constructed at the north-eastern corner. The cathedral has three entrances - the southern, western and northern, of which the western was the main one intended for ceremonial processions. A gate standing at the entrance is known as the Sigtuna Gate (mid-12th century); according to legend, it was brought from the Swedish town of Sigtuna in 1187. The second name of the gate derives from the town of Magdeburg, where it was made. The two leaves are decorated with biblical and evangelical scenes in cast bronze relief. In the lower left corner there are portraits of the craftsmen who created this superb specimen of medieval Western European bronze-work. An inscription in Latin gives their names, Riquin and Weissmut. The small central figure - judging from an inscription in Slavonic - is a representation of the Russian master craftsman Avraam, who assembled the gate.

There is yet another bronze gate in the cathedral, called the Korsun Gate. Made in the 11th century in Chersonesos, Byzantium, it leads from the southern gallery into the Nativity Side-Chapel. Legend has it that the gate was handed over to Novgorod as a gift of Prince Yaroslav the Wise (c. 978 - 1054).

The interior of the cathedral is as majestic as its exterior. It is divided by huge piers into five aisles, three of which end in altar apses. In the south-western corner, inside the tower, there is a wide spiral in relatively small, modest buildings of the 12th - 16th centuries.