Sitting in the highest point of Petit Bayonne you will find the  Château-Neuf (“new castle”) built in the 15th century by Charles IV. This massive building now belongs to the university and is unfortunately closed to the public.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

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3.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gustavo De Almeida (5 months ago)
Very comfortable and inexpensive. Well located and spacious. For a weekend in this beautiful city I highly recommend it.
Carlos A. (15 months ago)
The location is unbeatable. The facilities somewhat dirty and does not smell too good. During the day the area is very quiet and pleasant. At night it is not possible to rest due to the excessive noise of the bars.
Yulia Feliz Shapovalova (2 years ago)
It's very beautiful, but it's very noisy. Beside it there is a bar which is a bit creepy, there is people that look like aee doing bad things. Also in the mornings 30 trash trucks come and make a loud song of working.
Yulia Feliz Shapovalova (2 years ago)
It's very beautiful, but it's very noisy. Beside it there is a bar which is a bit creepy, there is people that look like aee doing bad things. Also in the mornings 30 trash trucks come and make a loud song of working.
Lucie Geneviève (2 years ago)
Petite résidence en plein centre de Bayonne, très agréable commerces à proximité et également un parking. La chambre n'est pas très grande mais très correcte avec une très belle salle de bain et un petit coin cuisine avec placard à l'entrée. Dommage pour l'emplacement tv il faudrais un meuble un peu plus grand et surtout plus haut.
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Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.