Sitting in the highest point of Petit Bayonne you will find the  Château-Neuf (“new castle”) built in the 15th century by Charles IV. This massive building now belongs to the university and is unfortunately closed to the public.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

3.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Carlos A. (11 months ago)
The location is unbeatable. The facilities somewhat dirty and does not smell too good. During the day the area is very quiet and pleasant. At night it is not possible to rest due to the excessive noise of the bars.
Yulia Feliz Shapovalova (2 years ago)
It's very beautiful, but it's very noisy. Beside it there is a bar which is a bit creepy, there is people that look like aee doing bad things. Also in the mornings 30 trash trucks come and make a loud song of working.
Lucie Geneviève (2 years ago)
Petite résidence en plein centre de Bayonne, très agréable commerces à proximité et également un parking. La chambre n'est pas très grande mais très correcte avec une très belle salle de bain et un petit coin cuisine avec placard à l'entrée. Dommage pour l'emplacement tv il faudrais un meuble un peu plus grand et surtout plus haut.
Jérôme Blondel (3 years ago)
Perfect good price
Michela Asunis (3 years ago)
ATTENTION TO WHOEVER WANTS TO CHECK IN AFTER 18. Unfortunately I have to put one star to review, if I could I would take starts away instead. We asked if we could check-in late before making the reservation, they said was not a problem as they had a procedure for it. We called them again on the day of the check-in. All fine. They were supposed to leave us the keys in a safe box. Apparently they had the brilliant idea to give the codes to several guests, one of which took our key as well. We arrived at 23.30, emergency numbers works only till 22.30, so if something happens to you at 22.31 is your problem. We tried to contact them for a while, no answer, at 2am we had to look for another accommodation. The next day nobody ever called us to apologise or to explain us what happened. How do we know? We had to call them. Several times. We even had to ask for the refund, like if it wasn't obvious. REMINDER FOR THE STAFF OF THE HOTEL: Problems do happen, you need to be good to come out of it somehow. You are NOT since you did ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to at least apologise. RIDICULOUS.
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The Abbey of Saint-Etienne, also known as Abbaye aux Hommes ('Men"s Abbey'), is a former monastery dedicated to Saint Stephen (Saint Étienne). It is considered, along with the neighbouring Abbaye aux Dames ('Ladies" Abbey'), to be one of the most notable Romanesque buildings in Normandy. Like all the major abbeys in Normandy, it was Benedictine.

Lanfranc, before being an Archbishop of Canterbury, was abbot of Saint-Etienne. Built in Caen stone during the 11th century, the two semi-completed churches stood for many decades in competition. An important feature added to both churches in about 1120 was the ribbed vault, used for the first time in France. The two abbey churches are considered forerunners of the Gothic architecture. The original Romanesque apse was replaced in 1166 by an early Gothic chevet, complete with rosette windows and flying buttresses. Nine towers and spires were added in the 13th century. The interior vaulting shows a similar progression, beginning with early sexpartite vaulting (using circular ribs) in the nave and progressing to quadipartite vaults (using pointed ribs) in the sanctuary.

The two monasteries were finally donated by William the Conqueror and his wife, Matilda of Flanders, as penalty for their marriage against the Pope"s ruling. William was buried here; Matilda was buried in the Abbaye aux Dames. Unfortunately William"s original tombstone of black marble, the same kind as Matilda"s in the Abbaye aux Dames, was destroyed by the Calvinist iconoclasts in the 16th century and his bones scattered.

As a consequence of the Wars of Religion, the high lantern tower in the middle of the church collapsed and was never rebuilt. The Benedictine abbey was suppressed during the French Revolution and the abbey church became a parish church. From 1804 to 1961, the abbey buildings accommodated a prestigious high school, the Lycée Malherbe. During the Normandy Landings in 1944, inhabitants of Caen found refuge in the church; on the rooftop there was a red cross, made with blood on a sheet, to show that it was a hospital (to avoid bombings).