Sitting in the highest point of Petit Bayonne you will find the  Château-Neuf (“new castle”) built in the 15th century by Charles IV. This massive building now belongs to the university and is unfortunately closed to the public.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

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3.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Carlos A. (4 months ago)
The location is unbeatable. The facilities somewhat dirty and does not smell too good. During the day the area is very quiet and pleasant. At night it is not possible to rest due to the excessive noise of the bars.
Yulia Feliz Shapovalova (2 years ago)
It's very beautiful, but it's very noisy. Beside it there is a bar which is a bit creepy, there is people that look like aee doing bad things. Also in the mornings 30 trash trucks come and make a loud song of working.
Lucie Geneviève (2 years ago)
Petite résidence en plein centre de Bayonne, très agréable commerces à proximité et également un parking. La chambre n'est pas très grande mais très correcte avec une très belle salle de bain et un petit coin cuisine avec placard à l'entrée. Dommage pour l'emplacement tv il faudrais un meuble un peu plus grand et surtout plus haut.
Jérôme Blondel (3 years ago)
Perfect good price
Michela Asunis (3 years ago)
ATTENTION TO WHOEVER WANTS TO CHECK IN AFTER 18. Unfortunately I have to put one star to review, if I could I would take starts away instead. We asked if we could check-in late before making the reservation, they said was not a problem as they had a procedure for it. We called them again on the day of the check-in. All fine. They were supposed to leave us the keys in a safe box. Apparently they had the brilliant idea to give the codes to several guests, one of which took our key as well. We arrived at 23.30, emergency numbers works only till 22.30, so if something happens to you at 22.31 is your problem. We tried to contact them for a while, no answer, at 2am we had to look for another accommodation. The next day nobody ever called us to apologise or to explain us what happened. How do we know? We had to call them. Several times. We even had to ask for the refund, like if it wasn't obvious. REMINDER FOR THE STAFF OF THE HOTEL: Problems do happen, you need to be good to come out of it somehow. You are NOT since you did ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to at least apologise. RIDICULOUS.
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Palazzo Colonna

The Palazzo Colonna is a palatial block of buildings built in part over ruins of an old Roman Serapeum, and has belonged to the prestigious Colonna family for over twenty generations.

The first part of the palace dates from the 13th century, and tradition holds that the building hosted Dante in his visit to Rome. The first documentary mention notes that the property hosted Cardinal Giovanni and Giacomo Colonna in the 13th century. It was also home to Cardinal Oddone Colonna before he ascended to the papacy as Martin V (1417–1431).

With his passing, the palace was sacked during feuds, and the main property passed into the hands of the Della Rovere family. It returned to the Colonna family when Marcantonio I Colonna married Lucrezia Gara Franciotti Della Rovere, the niece of pope Julius II. The Colonna"s alliance to the Habsburg power, likely protected the palace from looting during the Sack of Rome (1527).

Starting with Filippo Colonna (1578–1639) many changes have refurbished and create a unitary complex around a central garden. Architects including Girolamo Rainaldi and Paolo Marucelli labored on specific projects. Only in the 17th and 18th centuries were the main facades completed. Much of this design was completed by Antonio del Grande (including the grand gallery), and Girolamo Fontana (decoration of gallery). In the 18th century, the long low facade designed by Nicola Michetti with later additions by Paolo Posi with taller corner blocks (facing Piazza Apostoli) was constructed recalls earlier structures resembling a fortification.

The main gallery (completed 1703) and the masterful Colonna art collection was acquired after 1650 by both the cardinal Girolamo I Colonna and his nephew the Connestabile Lorenzo Onofrio Colonna and includes works by Lorenzo Monaco, Domenico Ghirlandaio, Palma the Elder, Salviati, Bronzino, Tintoretto, Pietro da Cortona, Annibale Carracci (painting of The Beaneater), Guercino, Francesco Albani, Muziano and Guido Reni. Ceiling frescoes by Filippo Gherardi, Giovanni Coli, Sebastiano Ricci, and Giuseppe Bartolomeo Chiari celebrate the role of Marcantonio II Colonna in the battle of Lepanto (1571). The gallery is open to the public on Saturday mornings.

The older wing of the complex known as the Princess Isabelle"s apartments, but once housing Martin V"s library and palace, contains frescoes by Pinturicchio, Antonio Tempesta, Crescenzio Onofri, Giacinto Gimignani, and Carlo Cesi. It contains a collection of landscapes and genre scenes by painters like Gaspard Dughet, Caspar Van Wittel (Vanvitelli), and Jan Brueghel the Elder.

Along with the possessions of the Doria-Pamphilij and Pallavacini-Rospigliosi families, this is one of the largest private art collections in Rome.