Sitting in the highest point of Petit Bayonne you will find the  Château-Neuf (“new castle”) built in the 15th century by Charles IV. This massive building now belongs to the university and is unfortunately closed to the public.

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Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

Rating

3.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Carlos A. (8 months ago)
The location is unbeatable. The facilities somewhat dirty and does not smell too good. During the day the area is very quiet and pleasant. At night it is not possible to rest due to the excessive noise of the bars.
Yulia Feliz Shapovalova (2 years ago)
It's very beautiful, but it's very noisy. Beside it there is a bar which is a bit creepy, there is people that look like aee doing bad things. Also in the mornings 30 trash trucks come and make a loud song of working.
Lucie Geneviève (2 years ago)
Petite résidence en plein centre de Bayonne, très agréable commerces à proximité et également un parking. La chambre n'est pas très grande mais très correcte avec une très belle salle de bain et un petit coin cuisine avec placard à l'entrée. Dommage pour l'emplacement tv il faudrais un meuble un peu plus grand et surtout plus haut.
Jérôme Blondel (3 years ago)
Perfect good price
Michela Asunis (3 years ago)
ATTENTION TO WHOEVER WANTS TO CHECK IN AFTER 18. Unfortunately I have to put one star to review, if I could I would take starts away instead. We asked if we could check-in late before making the reservation, they said was not a problem as they had a procedure for it. We called them again on the day of the check-in. All fine. They were supposed to leave us the keys in a safe box. Apparently they had the brilliant idea to give the codes to several guests, one of which took our key as well. We arrived at 23.30, emergency numbers works only till 22.30, so if something happens to you at 22.31 is your problem. We tried to contact them for a while, no answer, at 2am we had to look for another accommodation. The next day nobody ever called us to apologise or to explain us what happened. How do we know? We had to call them. Several times. We even had to ask for the refund, like if it wasn't obvious. REMINDER FOR THE STAFF OF THE HOTEL: Problems do happen, you need to be good to come out of it somehow. You are NOT since you did ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to at least apologise. RIDICULOUS.
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Heraclea Lyncestis

Heraclea Lyncestis was an ancient Greek city in Macedon, ruled later by the Romans. It was founded by Philip II of Macedon in the middle of the 4th century BC. The city was named in honor of the mythological hero Heracles. The name Lynkestis originates from the name of the ancient kingdom, conquered by Philip, where the city was built.

Heraclea was a strategically important town during the Hellenistic period, as it was at the edge of Macedon"s border with Epirus to the west and Paeonia to the north, until the middle of the 2nd century BC, when the Romans conquered Macedon and destroyed its political power. The main Roman road in the area, Via Egnatia went through Heraclea, and Heraclea was an important stop. The prosperity of the city was maintained mainly due to this road.

The Roman emperor Hadrian built a theatre in the center of the town, on a hill, when many buildings in the Roman province of Macedonia were being restored. It began being used during the reign of Antoninus Pius. Inside the theatre there were three animal cages and in the western part a tunnel. The theatre went out of use during the late 4th century AD, when gladiator fights in the Roman Empire were banned, due to the spread of Christianity, the formulation of the Eastern Roman Empire, and the abandonment of, what was then perceived as, pagan rituals and entertainment.

Late Antiquity and Byzantine periods

In the early Byzantine period (4th to 6th centuries AD) Heraclea was an important episcopal centre. A small and a great basilica, the bishop"s residence, and a funerary basilica and the necropolis are some of the remains of this period. Three naves in the Great Basilica are covered with mosaics of very rich floral and figurative iconography; these well preserved mosaics are often regarded as fine examples of the early Christian art period.

The city was sacked by Ostrogoth/Visigoth forces, commanded by Theodoric the Great in 472 AD and again in 479 AD. It was restored in the late 5th and early 6th century. When an earthquake struck in 518 AD, the inhabitants of Heraclea gradually abandoned the city. Subsequently, at the eve of the 7th century, the Dragovites, a Slavic tribe pushed down from the north by the Avars, settled in the area. The last coin issue dates from ca. 585, which suggests that the city was finally captured by the Slavs. As result, in place of the deserted city theatre several huts were built.

The Episcopacy Residence was excavated between 1970 and 1975. The western part was discovered first and the southern side is near the town wall. The luxury rooms are located in the eastern part. The 2nd, 3rd and 4th rooms all have mosaic floors. Between the 3rd and 4th rooms there is a hole that led to the eastern entrance of the residence. The hole was purposefully created between the 4th and 6th century.