Château d'Abbadie

Hendaye, France

Château d'Abbadie is a château in Hendaye. Built between 1864 and 1879, it was designed in the neo-Gothic style by E. Viollet-le-Duc and incorporated many enigmatic features characteristic of its owner, the explorer Antoine Thomson d'Abbadie.

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Details

Founded: 1864-1879
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alfred Kowalke (4 months ago)
Told us entrance to the park is 2€ each but the entrance is not at the castle and most of all its free... Not recommendable
Taylor Gaussoin (5 months ago)
Pretty decent Castle considering the significance of the time. Could have done a better job with the downspouts to ensure the native lime in the Water does not compromise the mortar. Staff not as accommodating as it once was in the 1930s.
José Aguasvivas (8 months ago)
Impressive architectural work and interesting history. The guided tour is a must.
Jorge De Aragon (9 months ago)
Very beautiful place, great views, free parking, free bathrooms, vending machine, entry costs 2€, guided tour costs 9,5€ (French, English, Spanish languages). There are also beach, park for walking and other things for outdoor activities. Highly recommended place.
Natalia Irina Crea (14 months ago)
Stunning palace, such a shame they only offer tours in French. They give you some information in your native language but you miss 50% of the tour. Girl giving the tour was a sweetheart and made the visit fly by. Would have loved to be able to understand everything she said as it seemed to be pretty interesting. Still worth the visit!
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