San Sebastián Cathedral

San Sebastián, Spain

The Cathedral of the Good Shepherd is located in the city of San Sebastián. It is the seat of the suffragan Diocese of San Sebastián and subordinated to the Archdiocese of Pamplona y Tudela. The most remarkable religious building of San Sebastián, it is endowed with a strong verticality and is the largest in Gipuzkoa. Its construction took place in the last years of the 19th century in a Historicist Neo-Gothic style. The church, dedicated to the Good Shepherd, has held the rank of cathedral since 1953.

The foundation stone was laid by the Spanish Royal Family in 1888. After just nine years of work (including almost two in which work was suspended for lack of resources), the Church of the Good Shepherd was consecrated for worship on July 30, 1897.

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Details

Founded: 1888-1897
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

JUHUI ZHANG (2 years ago)
Nice meeting point of the town!
Jaime Olivé (2 years ago)
Beautiful, however few places to have dinner around
Nicholas Crosby (2 years ago)
Beautiful cathedral in the heart of San Sebastián.
Cristina No (2 years ago)
Absolutely gorgeous! Do not miss this place!!! The cathedral it’s a jewel. It’s interesting no matter if you are a 3 or a 93 year old. Definitely a place to see. Backpackers and luxurious tourist all gadget on one of the most beautiful places of the city. This church is being used as a church so please be respectful to those who are praying.
Liz T.D (3 years ago)
We only looked in the door but I'm sure it's lovely. There was a €3 entrance fee so I decided to give money to the chap sitting at the entrance who looked like he needed it. The carvings and architectural features externally are amazing. It's been bruised by the salt air but still wonderful. Brilliant location, oozes strength.
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