Château de Caumont

Cazaux-Savès, France

Château de Caumont consists of two buildings on a vast esplanade overlooking the Save river valley. The old castle built on the site of a fortified castle that belonged to Gaston Phoebus. The present Renaissance castle whose construction lasted from 1525 to 1535.

The castle sits on two levels of underground vaults, it is flanked by four strong towers so that openings and slits control the facades. Two octagonal towers are guarding the West side. One can observe four “pepper“ towers pepper which are located in the eastern and northern parts. The structure is alternating bricks and stones bands which allow light to play with much happiness. 

U-shaped three wings are surrounding a beautiful courtyard recently restored. On the ground floor, divided windows open onto the courtyard. Upstairs, windows have with less divisions . The beautiful front door opens onto a staircase according to the Florentine fashion adorned with vaulted bays alternating three classical Greek building methods . In the courtyard on the north wing, on the first floor on can find a shuttle race representing a fairly typical outdoor works of Mr Bachelier as found at the Hotel d'Assezat in Toulouse. This shuttle race, where one has a nice view over the park and Cedars trees of Lebanon, can reach the courtyard by a spiral staircase of the sixteenth century. 

On the first floor, a Romantic chapel with a beautiful stained glass window designed by Master Marechal, who also signed the windows of the Fourviere Basilica in Lyon. In the north wing, the room where the King Henri III of Navarre, the future Henry IV, stayed. Pierre de Nogaret de La Valette Nogaret built the present castle on his return from Italy wars he made with Francis 1. His grand-son, Jean-Louis de Nogaret de La Valette Nogaret was born there in 1554 and became Duke of Epernon thanks to Henry III he served before Henri IV and Louis XIII. Then he endured a less favorable period as Richelieu, who feared him much, sequestered all his possessions - including the Cadillac castle - and had him locked in Loches dungeons, where he died at the age of 88. Caumont castle escaped this fate as the Duke of Epernon had already given it to one of his sons.

In the nineteenth century, Armand, Marquis de Castelbajac, lived between the campaigns of the Napoléon Grand Army. He then left with his wife, Sophie de La Rochefoucauld-Liancourt, as Ambassador to St. Petersburg in Russia during Napoleon III reign. Then, Senator of the Empire and President of the General Council of Gers department, he devoted the rest of his life to this department. Today, the old castle and an orangery were restored and converted into reception rooms used for special occasions: weddings, seminars, exhibitions, etc.

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Details

Founded: 1525-1535
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

www.caumont.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Elias Daniel (3 years ago)
A very beautiful castle where we enjoyed the peaceful environment for the wedding of my niece. I highly recommend the place to visit or for a wedding.
Cornel Dinescu (3 years ago)
Old but is beautiful!
Des McLaughlin (3 years ago)
An interesting tour of a somewhat sad shadow of what must have been a 'great chateau' up to the last century. See the rooms where kings and queens visited during the heyday of the chateau. Lots of other things to see including the kitchen in the basement where you can see the different ways that they used to cook.
Artys art collectors (3 years ago)
A magnificent place in a wild nest of nature with multi-centennaries oak trees and an early Renaissance architecture. I came here for an art festival party and I will come back again with some artists.
Ursula Emirates (4 years ago)
A beautiful place where we celebrated my sister's wedding last month. The castle is amazing and the young owners were helpful in all our needs. I recommend also the tour inside.
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