Château de Bouvées

Labrihe, France

Château de Bouvées was built between 1530 and 1560 by Monseigneur de Saint-Julien, Bishop of Aire-sur-Adour, on the ruins of an earlier structure. At the time of the French Revolution, it was sold as a national asset.

The building consisted of three wings enclosing an inner courtyard, flanked in the corners by round towers. Only the east and south parts remain, the agricultural buildings attached to the ancient walls reproducing the earlier layout. Of the towers, all that remain are that in the south-east and traces of the south-west. The pigeon loft was built on the base of a tower. A demolished wall near the chapel reveals the former gatehouse which led into the courtyard. The chapel still has sculptures and two mullioned windows decorated with mouldings. Attached is a round tower standing on a base with four floors. A vaulted cellar gave surveillance of the surrounding area by spy holes. Inside are 15th and 18th century chimneys, earthenware paving, beamed ceilings and visible joists.

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Details

Founded: 1530
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jerome Bazile (2 months ago)
Pour "brendre" une grande "bouvèe" d'air purent d'histoire locale ......Top ! Tchuss
Danielle (3 months ago)
Magnifique lieu, dépaysement dans le temps et l'espace.
Milene Muzard (5 months ago)
Lieux magnifique avec une super bonne énergie. Les chambres sont grandes, toutes différentes, prix abordable. Le propriétaire est très agréable. Parking gratuit devant le château. On peut se balader sur le terrain et dans le bois. C'est très calme et tranquille. Il y a des ânes qui adorent être caressés. Je recommande. C'est une très belle expérience.
KARINE BRIFFLOT (6 months ago)
Cadre très sympathique et accueil chaleureux. Je recommande.
AS AP (11 months ago)
The host is of an incredible pleasant, kind, intelligent, interesting character. He is there to help you as much and when ever you need but he is also discreet and out of your way. The castle - is wonderful, the donkeys are amazing and friendly you can just walk out with them and they follow you around the grounds. The pool is great. The outside space is wonderful for eating outside. And in the winter he keeps the castle incredibly warm for an old building. So much love and attention to detail has been put into the place and he will happily give you a tour and tell you all about it. It is also SUPER clean. We go here often and every group we have been with has loved it, and can't wait to come back.
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