Château de Bouvées

Labrihe, France

Château de Bouvées was built between 1530 and 1560 by Monseigneur de Saint-Julien, Bishop of Aire-sur-Adour, on the ruins of an earlier structure. At the time of the French Revolution, it was sold as a national asset.

The building consisted of three wings enclosing an inner courtyard, flanked in the corners by round towers. Only the east and south parts remain, the agricultural buildings attached to the ancient walls reproducing the earlier layout. Of the towers, all that remain are that in the south-east and traces of the south-west. The pigeon loft was built on the base of a tower. A demolished wall near the chapel reveals the former gatehouse which led into the courtyard. The chapel still has sculptures and two mullioned windows decorated with mouldings. Attached is a round tower standing on a base with four floors. A vaulted cellar gave surveillance of the surrounding area by spy holes. Inside are 15th and 18th century chimneys, earthenware paving, beamed ceilings and visible joists.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1530
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jerome Bazile (2 years ago)
Pour "brendre" une grande "bouvèe" d'air purent d'histoire locale ......Top ! Tchuss
Danielle (2 years ago)
Magnifique lieu, dépaysement dans le temps et l'espace.
Milene Muzard (2 years ago)
Lieux magnifique avec une super bonne énergie. Les chambres sont grandes, toutes différentes, prix abordable. Le propriétaire est très agréable. Parking gratuit devant le château. On peut se balader sur le terrain et dans le bois. C'est très calme et tranquille. Il y a des ânes qui adorent être caressés. Je recommande. C'est une très belle expérience.
KARINE BRIFFLOT (2 years ago)
Cadre très sympathique et accueil chaleureux. Je recommande.
AS AP (3 years ago)
The host is of an incredible pleasant, kind, intelligent, interesting character. He is there to help you as much and when ever you need but he is also discreet and out of your way. The castle - is wonderful, the donkeys are amazing and friendly you can just walk out with them and they follow you around the grounds. The pool is great. The outside space is wonderful for eating outside. And in the winter he keeps the castle incredibly warm for an old building. So much love and attention to detail has been put into the place and he will happily give you a tour and tell you all about it. It is also SUPER clean. We go here often and every group we have been with has loved it, and can't wait to come back.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Mosque–Cathedral of Córdoba

The Mosque–Cathedral of Córdoba, also known as the Great Mosque of Córdoba and the Mezquita is regarded as one of the most accomplished monuments of Moorish architecture.

According to a traditional account, a small Visigoth church, the Catholic Basilica of Saint Vincent of Lérins, originally stood on the site. In 784 Abd al-Rahman I ordered construction of the Great Mosque, which was considerably expanded by later Muslim rulers. The mosque underwent numerous subsequent changes: Abd al-Rahman II ordered a new minaret, while in 961 Al-Hakam II enlarged the building and enriched the Mihrab. The last of such reforms was carried out by Almanzor in 987. It was connected to the Caliph"s palace by a raised walkway, mosques within the palaces being the tradition for previous Islamic rulers – as well as Christian Kings who built their palaces adjacent to churches. The Mezquita reached its current dimensions in 987 with the completion of the outer naves and courtyard.

In 1236, Córdoba was conquered by King Ferdinand III of Castile, and the centre of the mosque was converted into a Catholic cathedral. Alfonso X oversaw the construction of the Villaviciosa Chapel and the Royal Chapel within the mosque. The kings who followed added further Christian features, such as King Henry II rebuilding the chapel in the 14th century. The minaret of the mosque was also converted to the bell tower of the cathedral. It was adorned with Santiago de Compostela"s captured cathedral bells. Following a windstorm in 1589, the former minaret was further reinforced by encasing it within a new structure.

The most significant alteration was the building of a Renaissance cathedral nave in the middle of the expansive structure. The insertion was constructed by permission of Charles V, king of Castile and Aragon. Artisans and architects continued to add to the existing structure until the late 18th century.

Architecture

The building"s floor plan is seen to be parallel to some of the earliest mosques built from the very beginning of Islam. It had a rectangular prayer hall with aisles arranged perpendicular to the qibla, the direction towards which Muslims pray. The prayer hall was large and flat, with timber ceilings held up by arches of horseshoe-like appearance.

In planning the mosque, the architects incorporated a number of Roman columns with choice capitals. Some of the columns were already in the Gothic structure; others were sent from various regions of Iberia as presents from the governors of provinces. Ivory, jasper, porphyry, gold, silver, copper, and brass were used in the decorations. Marvellous mosaics and azulejos were designed. Later, the immense temple embodied all the styles of Morisco architecture into one composition.

The building is most notable for its arcaded hypostyle hall, with 856 columns of jasper, onyx, marble, granite and porphyry. These were made from pieces of the Roman temple that had occupied the site previously, as well as other Roman buildings, such as the Mérida amphitheatre. The double arches were an innovation, permitting higher ceilings than would otherwise be possible with relatively low columns. The double arches consist of a lower horseshoe arch and an upper semi-circular arch.