Auch Cathedral

Auch, France

Auch Cathedral of Sainte-Marie (1489–1662) is one of the finest Gothic buildings of southern France. Its chief features are 113 Renaissance choir stalls of carved oak and Renaissance stained-glass windows by Arnaud de Moles. The cathedral’s classical facade dates from the 16th and 17th centuries, and its great organ (17th century) is one of the finest in the world for playing Baroque music. The 18th-century archbishop’s palace, with a 14th-century tower, adjoins the cathedral. Nearby are a museum of art and archaeology and a museum containing the historical archives of the département of Gers, together with a large library and a collection of manuscripts. The prefecture, adjoining the cathedral, was once the palace of the archbishops of Auch.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1489-1662
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Abdel Touré (3 years ago)
Beautiful cathedral.
Leona Suarez (3 years ago)
a masterpiece in Southern France
Standford Naomi (3 years ago)
amazingly beautiful Cathedral with a very spiritual atmosphere
Paddy (4 years ago)
An absolutely fascinating place to visit. The town itself is quite dull and maybe old and boring, but the cathedral suddenly outshines all of this with it's very high ceiling and incredible architecture. Definitely a place to visit.
P. B. (4 years ago)
Original destination but because of Monumental staircase and d'artagnan statue + very hot day we couldn't make. Cathedral looks impressive from outside.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Late Baroque Town of Ragusa

The eight towns in south-eastern Sicily, including Ragusa, were all rebuilt after 1693 on or beside towns existing at the time of the earthquake which took place in that year. They represent a considerable collective undertaking, successfully carried out at a high level of architectural and artistic achievement. Keeping within the late Baroque style of the day, they also depict distinctive innovations in town planning and urban building. Together with seven other cities in the Val di Noto, it is part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

In 1693 Ragusa was devastated by a huge earthquake, which killed some 5,000 inhabitants. Following this catastrophe the city was largely rebuilt, and many Baroque buildings from this time remain in the city. Most of the population moved to a new settlement in the former district of Patro, calling this new municipality 'Ragusa Superiore' (Upper Ragusa) and the ancient city 'Ragusa Inferiore' (Lower Ragusa). The two cities remained separated until 1926, when they were fused together to become a provincial capital in 1927.