Auch Cathedral

Auch, France

Auch Cathedral of Sainte-Marie (1489–1662) is one of the finest Gothic buildings of southern France. Its chief features are 113 Renaissance choir stalls of carved oak and Renaissance stained-glass windows by Arnaud de Moles. The cathedral’s classical facade dates from the 16th and 17th centuries, and its great organ (17th century) is one of the finest in the world for playing Baroque music. The 18th-century archbishop’s palace, with a 14th-century tower, adjoins the cathedral. Nearby are a museum of art and archaeology and a museum containing the historical archives of the département of Gers, together with a large library and a collection of manuscripts. The prefecture, adjoining the cathedral, was once the palace of the archbishops of Auch.

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Details

Founded: 1489-1662
Category: Religious sites in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Abdel Touré (3 months ago)
Beautiful cathedral.
Leona Suarez (4 months ago)
a masterpiece in Southern France
Standford Naomi (4 months ago)
amazingly beautiful Cathedral with a very spiritual atmosphere
Paddy (9 months ago)
An absolutely fascinating place to visit. The town itself is quite dull and maybe old and boring, but the cathedral suddenly outshines all of this with it's very high ceiling and incredible architecture. Definitely a place to visit.
P. B. (11 months ago)
Original destination but because of Monumental staircase and d'artagnan statue + very hot day we couldn't make. Cathedral looks impressive from outside.
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