Lectoure Cathedral

Lectoure, France

The former Lectoure Cathedral dominates the town and the belfry tower of 1488 can be seen at a distance as the town is approached. The repairs and modifications of the cathedral go back to the 12th century. The unadorned west front erected in the 15th century has been modified through the ages, and niches above the door have all but melted away due to the fragility of the limestone.

The nave was vaulted at the end of the 12th century, then repaired in 1480. Vaulted chapels were added at the beginning of the 16th century and more alterations followed in the 17th and 18th centuries. The choir and apse were also reconstructed at the beginning of the 16th century, and the five square apsidal chapels were completed. The ambulatory was created in 1600 by introducing ten cylindrical piers, and the carved early 17th century choir stalls were placed here in the 19th century. The stained glass is typically 19th century with a Tree of Jesse in the Chapelle de la Sainte Famille.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

F Gomez (2 years ago)
Muy bonita e impresionante.
Marc du Chaffaut (2 years ago)
Une vue imprenable depuis le sommet de la tour
Juliette Piquet (2 years ago)
Très belle cathédrale. Le village est lui aussi agréable. Nous ne regrettons pas de nous être arrêtés sur notre route.
Eric Philippe Eliautou (2 years ago)
Superbe édifice et village pittoresque très agréable en mai
SiiN (2 years ago)
Cathedrale grandiose de part son architecture, ses reliques ainsi que ses vitraux et son orgue. Pour les fêtes de Noel vous pouvez admirez une splendide creche. A venir voir le soir quand la ville est illuminée c'est vraiment unique
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine is situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected by the Roman Senate to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge in 312. Dedicated in 315, it is the largest Roman triumphal arch. The arch spans the Via triumphalis, the way taken by the emperors when they entered the city in triumph.

Though dedicated to Constantine, much of the decorative material incorporated earlier work from the time of the emperors Trajan (98-117), Hadrian (117-138) and Marcus Aurelius (161-180), and is thus a collage. The last of the existing triumphal arches in Rome, it is also the only one to make extensive use of spolia, reusing several major reliefs from 2nd century imperial monuments, which give a striking and famous stylistic contrast to the sculpture newly created for the arch.

The arch is 21 m high, 25.9 m wide and 7.4 m deep. Above the archways is placed the attic, composed of brickwork reveted (faced) with marble. A staircase within the arch is entered from a door at some height from the ground, on the west side, facing the Palatine Hill. The general design with a main part structured by detached columns and an attic with the main inscription above is modelled after the example of the Arch of Septimius Severus on the Roman Forum.