Château de Lavardens

Lavardens, France

Château de Lavardens dominates the skyline of surrounding lands. Originally built in the 12th century, it was later a residence of Counts of Armagnac. The present massive structure dates from 1620 onwards and it was built on the ruins of medieval castle (destroyed by King's soldiers in 1496).

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Details

Founded: 1620
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

www.chateaulavardens.com

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Philip Highley (8 months ago)
Good restaurant. Didn't go into the chateau itself.
Paul Tulip (9 months ago)
This is a beautiful chateau They charge a fairly high price to enter and inside ??? Its a bloody shop!!!!!! Every room is set as a gallery for ' Arty' products !!! To add insult to injury the last room you are directed to is a??? Yes you guessed! A tourist shop selling rubbish unrelated to the Chateau Avoid entering just enjoy the outside
Paul Tulip (9 months ago)
This is a beautiful ancient château Outside it looks brilliant both from a distance and close up Initially thought that the 14+€ entry fee was worth while till we got inside It was a bloody shop!! All rooms had exhibits of art for sale ( not cheap) and had nothing to do with the history or story of this lovely Château At the end -- Guess what? A tourist shop selling stuff totally unrelated to the Chateau itself If I wanted to go shopping I would have gone to a big city outlet So disappointed! !!
TUDOR TEODORESCU (2 years ago)
Nice and quiet little village.
TyA Doan (2 years ago)
The emplacement is amazing. The castle is being taken care of but pretty nice. The expo are a bit ruin out.
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