Alaverdi Monastery

Akhmeta, Georgia

Alaverdi Monastery is a Georgian Eastern Orthodox monastery located 25 km from Akhmeta. While parts of the monastery date back to 6th century, the present day cathedral was built in the 11th century by Kvirike III of Kakheti, replacing an older church of St. George.

The monastery was founded by the Assyrian monk Joseph Alaverdeli, who came from Antioch and settled in Alaverdi, then a small village and former pagan religious center dedicated to the Moon. At a height of over 55 m, Alaverdi Cathedral was the tallest religious building in Georgia, until the construction of the Holy Trinity Cathedral of Tbilisi, which was consecrated in 2004.

The monastery is the focus of the annual religious celebration Alaverdoba. Situated in the heart of the world's oldest wine region, the monks also make their own wine, known as Alaverdi Monastery Cellar.

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Details

Founded: 6th century AD
Category: Religious sites in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Chicco Moni (2 years ago)
Aftera long straight path by car, the Alaverdi Monsatery will show to you and you can say simply "Woauuuuu". Fantastic place, one of the most beautiful monastery complex.
Turin Piat (2 years ago)
Stunning place to not be missed during your holiday in Georgia. Amazing place.
Konstantine Khajalia (2 years ago)
One of the main Orthodox churches in Georgia, beautiful ?? must see
Tornike Asatiani (2 years ago)
Great café at the entrance of the monastery with a fantastic local diary products
Vakhtang Gloveli (2 years ago)
One of the most important medieval monument and the highest cathedral(up to 50m) in Georgia, built in 11th century. There is a matsoni cafe, winery cellar and beekeeper farm.
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