Alaverdi Monastery

Akhmeta, Georgia

Alaverdi Monastery is a Georgian Eastern Orthodox monastery located 25 km from Akhmeta. While parts of the monastery date back to 6th century, the present day cathedral was built in the 11th century by Kvirike III of Kakheti, replacing an older church of St. George.

The monastery was founded by the Assyrian monk Joseph Alaverdeli, who came from Antioch and settled in Alaverdi, then a small village and former pagan religious center dedicated to the Moon. At a height of over 55 m, Alaverdi Cathedral was the tallest religious building in Georgia, until the construction of the Holy Trinity Cathedral of Tbilisi, which was consecrated in 2004.

The monastery is the focus of the annual religious celebration Alaverdoba. Situated in the heart of the world's oldest wine region, the monks also make their own wine, known as Alaverdi Monastery Cellar.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 6th century AD
Category: Religious sites in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Chicco Moni (11 months ago)
Aftera long straight path by car, the Alaverdi Monsatery will show to you and you can say simply "Woauuuuu". Fantastic place, one of the most beautiful monastery complex.
Turin Piat (11 months ago)
Stunning place to not be missed during your holiday in Georgia. Amazing place.
Konstantine Khajalia (14 months ago)
One of the main Orthodox churches in Georgia, beautiful ?? must see
Tornike Asatiani (15 months ago)
Great café at the entrance of the monastery with a fantastic local diary products
Vakhtang Gloveli (15 months ago)
One of the most important medieval monument and the highest cathedral(up to 50m) in Georgia, built in 11th century. There is a matsoni cafe, winery cellar and beekeeper farm.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.