Slagsta Rock Carvings

Botkyrka, Sweden

The rock carvings in Slagsta are the largest in Stockholm County. Rock carvings from the Bronze Age consists of 17 ships, three animal figures, a sole, 2-3 indeterminate figures, around 170 cup marks and a human figure. The human figure is characteristically designed legs with strong calves. During the same is a shallow carved ship depicted. The total machined surface is 4.8 x 3.3 meters.

Slagsta inscription discovered September 13, 1971 by chance when it landed in the middle of the road construction for Botkyrka Trail. The appliance was then completely overgrown and unknown. Next to the road construction was going on archaeological investigations and one of the archaeologist, Rudolf Hansson, was curious on the hob. When he lifted out a piece of moss was a ship picture emerges. Road authorities changed at the last minute stretch of road and hob was left. The hob is dated to 1800-500 years f.kr, but probably it performed during the late Bronze Age. What this place meant to the Bronze Age people are not fully understood. Likely would place a ritual-magical meaning where people were directed against a higher power.

Petroglyphs located along Hallunda cultural trail, opposite Slagsta motel. By car you drive Botkyrka trail until Slagsta Road.

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Details

Founded: 1800-500 BC
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Sweden
Historical period: Neolithic Age (Sweden)

More Information

sv.wikipedia.org
holmers.com

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