Achi Monastery

Achi, Georgia

The Achi monastery is a single-nave hall church, built of hewn stone. Constructed at the end of the 13th century or in the early 14th, it was later reroofed, renovated and surrounded by a defensive wall. The whole interior is frescoed. Some murals, stylistically dated to the late 13th century and betraying affinities with the Palaeologan art, are iconographic rarities, such as those depicting the life of Saint George.

The Achi monastery was favored by the Princes of Guria, especially Simon I Gurieli and Kaikhosro I Gurieli in the 17th century. Both made significant donations to the church and Kaikhosro made it a metochion of the bishopric see of Shemokmedi. The abbotship of Achi was then hereditary in the Salukvadze-Taqaishvili family. The church housed a gilded silver cross with a Georgian inscription mentioning the queen Tamar, which was discovered by Ekvtime Taqaishvili. The item was preserved in the Salukvadze family during the Soviet period and returned to the Achi church in 2015.

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Address

Achi, Georgia
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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

TheZaitseva (3 years ago)
Nice place
tsotne mtvaradze (3 years ago)
დიდებული ადგილია
Grigol Makharadze (4 years ago)
Old church with unique frescoes of Pontius Pilate and Saint George inside it. Advance booking is needed
MarthaG (4 years ago)
It's such a beautiful place to visit
directioner (4 years ago)
It's such a beautiful place to visit
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