New Athos Monastery

Akhali Atoni, Georgia

New Athos Monastery is a monastery in Akhali Atoni (New Athos), in a breakaway republic of Abkhazia, founded in 1875 by monks who came from the St. Panteleimon Monastery in Mount Athos. They founded the church of St. Panteleimon on Mount Iveria, on the territory of present New Athos. Construction works of the monastery were carried out in 1883-1896 as well.

In the centre of the west building bell-tower 50 metres high is erected. In the lower part of the bell-tower, a monastic refectory is located. In the middle of the monastic complex stands the five-domed church of St. Panteleimon, in the architecture of which traits of the so called Neo-Byzantine style are discernible. Interior of the church is totally embellished with the mural decoration.

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Akhali Atoni, Georgia
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Details

Founded: 1875
Category: Religious sites in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

A S (7 months ago)
Every place like that deserves its share of our attention since there we really feel the calmness of our world; and no matter which belief you particularly prefer. It's a very interesting monastery with its history, despite the fact it's not so long. The very atmosphere as inside that as around its territory is so smoothing and views are so fantastic that you almost forget about all your current day problems :). Along all the ways to the monastery there are a lot of local merchant traders - try some local wines and fresh citrus juices, especially made from mandarins :). Better to go there individually and in the very morning in order to avoid crowds and lack of time; at the very frontier you without any problem could hire a local taxi (just trade :)) or get a regular bus there (some about one hour and a half from the very frontier); and do not worry - the track there is not so mountainous as many people think :). God bless you and stay happy! :)
Vladislav Geller (8 months ago)
This is a must-visit.
Fatih Halbad (16 months ago)
It has quite a magnificent architecture. The frescoes inside are also very impressive. Moreover, transportation is very easy and entrance is free.
Tomasz Dembski (2 years ago)
Beautiful but no admittance at present... Closed by an ecclesiastical order from Sukhum by the hierarchs who recognise Russian Orthodox Church's overlordship.
Pranske Aš (2 years ago)
Sacral
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