New Athos Monastery

Akhali Atoni, Georgia

New Athos Monastery is a monastery in Akhali Atoni (New Athos), in a breakaway republic of Abkhazia, founded in 1875 by monks who came from the St. Panteleimon Monastery in Mount Athos. They founded the church of St. Panteleimon on Mount Iveria, on the territory of present New Athos. Construction works of the monastery were carried out in 1883-1896 as well.

In the centre of the west building bell-tower 50 metres high is erected. In the lower part of the bell-tower, a monastic refectory is located. In the middle of the monastic complex stands the five-domed church of St. Panteleimon, in the architecture of which traits of the so called Neo-Byzantine style are discernible. Interior of the church is totally embellished with the mural decoration.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Address

Akhali Atoni, Georgia
See all sites in Akhali Atoni

Details

Founded: 1875
Category: Religious sites in Georgia

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tomasz Dembski (8 months ago)
Beautiful but no admittance at present... Closed by an ecclesiastical order from Sukhum by the hierarchs who recognise Russian Orthodox Church's overlordship.
Pranske Aš (8 months ago)
Sacral
Andy Lewis (10 months ago)
Beautiful building
Катя Адищева (2 years ago)
Wery beutiful place and monestery. Long Stone road and big trees. Nice view to the sea.
NEL (2 years ago)
Very Good
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Aarhus Old Town

The Old Town in Aarhus, Denmark (Den Gamle By), is an open-air town museum consisting of 75 historical buildings collected from 20 townships in all parts of the country. In 1914 the museum opened as the world's first open-air museum of its kind, concentrating on town culture rather than village culture, and to this day it remains one of just a few top rated Danish museums outside Copenhagen.

The museum buildings are organized into a small town of chiefly half-timbered structures originally erected between 1550 and the late 19th century in various parts of the country and later moved to Aarhus during the 20th century. In all there are some 27 rooms, chambers or kitchens, 34 workshops, 10 groceries or shops, 5 historical gardens, a post office, a customs office, a school and a theatre.

The town itself is the main attraction but most buildings are open for visitors; rooms are either decorated in the original historical style or organized into larger exhibits of which there are 5 regular with varying themes. There are several groceries, diners and workshops spread throughout the town with museum staff working in the roles of town figures i.e. merchant, blacksmith etc. adding to the illusion of a 'living' town.