Ekebyhov Castle

Ekerö, Sweden

The estate of Ekebyhov was created by Klas Horn (1583-1632) in the 1620s by merging farms Ekeby, Hovgården and Gällsta. Horn built a stone castle on three floors, which now no longer exists. The existing palace is a wooden two-storey building built in the 1670s, when Field Marshal Count Carl Gustaf Wrangel acquired Ekebyhov. Wrangel's death in 1676 halted the construction and it was resumed in 1701, when Baron Eric Lovisin had bought the estate.

After several ownership changes during the second half of the 1700s, Ekebyhov became as a residence of Albrecht Ihre in 1790. His son's grandson, Captain Bengt Ihre Johan Albrecht (1867-1956) built a nursery at the castle, planted with 400,000 trees, and seemed to increase fruit production in Sweden and Finland.

The Ekebyhov was owned by the family Ihre until 1980 and castle park with a wide variation of fruit trees has descended from Johan Ihre time. Today the castle is used as municipal conference center and cultural activities in association management.

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Details

Founded: 1670-1701
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Swedish Empire (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Johan Aron Hjorth (2 years ago)
Friendly staff and fresh buffé. Great ambience and big garden. There is also a play area outside.
Siv Norman (2 years ago)
Superb mat
Fredrik Åsberg (2 years ago)
Ok
James Layfield (2 years ago)
Yum! Lovely little quirky veggie spot in a historic, and some say haunted, castle. The lunch buffet is great value with a lovely selection. If you, like me, want gluten free they have that covered too
Hermann Dammeyer (7 years ago)
Frist Class food!!!
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