Castel d'Ario Castle

Castel D'ario, Italy

Castel d'Ario Castle was a strategic element of a defensive system into the Mantuan territory, together with Castelbelforte and Villimpenta Castles, placed on the borderline with Veneto.

Castel D'Ario Castle represents one of the main medieval fenced-in castles with a pentagonal shape. Five towers are visible, included that one at the entrance, where people can still see the location where there was a portcullis and the ruins of the opposite ravelin. A significant restoration of the praetorian Palace at the end of the 20th century has brought to life frescos at the walls of the first floor, with the escutcheons of the Scaligeris, the lords from Verona, owners of the Castle for twenty years in the second half of the 14th century.

One of the towers inside the castle is called Torre della Fame; the tower was called like this because in the middle of the 19th century some skeletons were found out in this place; probably they belonged to members of Pico della Mirandola and Bonacolsi families, locked up and starved here. A headstone on the castle door reminds to this event.

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Details

Founded: 10th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Enrica Treccani (11 months ago)
Beautiful castle !!! But what is a tennis court doing inside ... ???? ... The 5 stars are x the castle at its origin !!!
marco remondini (11 months ago)
Fantastic!!!
Riccardo Peron (3 years ago)
Beautiful stronghold with urban layout and all 5 towers still present. The tower of hunger is well preserved with a commemorative plaque. Illuminated and visible during the night. The attached park is also very beautiful.
Adriana Vigna (3 years ago)
Potrebbe essere gestito meglio con visite guidate da persone che ne conoscano la storia vera
Adriana Vigna (3 years ago)
It could be better managed with guided tours by people who know the true story
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