Museum of Almería

Almería, Spain

The Museum of Almería maintains the largest collection of archaeological remains in Almería. In 2006 the museum moved to a new building designed by Ignacio García Pedrosa and Ángela García de Paredes.

The permanent exhibition is located on the first and second floors of the building and they focus mainly on the hunters' and foragers' society. On the second floor, is a metal structure in the middle of the room called the Circle of Life. Surrounding it can be found materials that teach us about trade and war of the Millares society. There are also objects related to the daily life of the settlement. The Circle of Death display, with the support of a video projection, shadows and sound, demonstrates much about the collective use of the graves and the ritual sequence carried out with each new burial.

On the second floor is an interesting layout of consecutive walls progressing from the bottom to the top, with the intention of showing how the society lived on the hillsides through their terraced homes and landscapes, especially in Fuente-Álamo, Cuevas del Almanzora, Almería. The area includes small sub-rooms with glass cases containing big vessels, bronze weapons, silver and gold objects and ceramics among other remains.

On the third floor can be found a long term display which currently has a large collection of Roman and Andalusian pieces. Of note is the beautiful sculpture which is installed on a large fragment of mosaic. This is the god Bacchus, found in a Roman villa excavated in the town of Chirivel, in the northern part of Almería. In this room can also be found other objects related to the large Roman influence in the Iberian Peninsula, specifically in Almería. One can also appreciate here some Andalusian art which is represented by a large collection of Muslim tombstones, of which Almería was the leading production center. The big cube that occupies the center of the room holds cabinets inside which are dedicated to the caliphate and hold ceramics, toys, coins, and the like.

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Details

Founded: 1934
Category: Museums in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lucija pečnik (13 months ago)
Free entrance, informations in english, worth visiting
Barbara (13 months ago)
You need approximately two hours to check everything in the object. It's a modern and big museum with archeological exposition. Full of examples of burials and everyday life of people in past. In some moments informations are very brutal how life of our ancestors looked like but it's only an advantage.
Kevin Davies (13 months ago)
Free Entry, and worth spending an hour looking round. I did find the Moor's artefacts the mist interesting.
Brian Couper (13 months ago)
Very interesting to see. Lots of information about surrounding areas.
Gordon Warburton (15 months ago)
Very nice, modern museum. Lots of things to see and do - only downside was lots of the computer screens / interactive features weren't working or switched on
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