Lacipo was founded in the second century BC for the local population. It grew considerably and its economic strength was based on olive oil. The town was a seat of government for the immediate area until it declined in the second century AD. The largest remain structure that can be seen today is a south facing section of town wall standing 30 feet high. Lacipo's ruins don't offer the traveler who can be bothered to climb the hill a great temple or amphitheatres, but a stunning view and a remarkable insight of two types of architecture standing side by side long after the people who knew then, lived and loved and worked in them have vanished into the years. Be wary of the idly grazing cows.

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Founded: 2nd century BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

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www.andalucia.com

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Oscar Bornico (3 years ago)
Ruins with a high historical value, but abandoned. To promote tourism they must do some infrastructure and it is not very expensive. But it is worth visiting an initially Phoenician and later Roman enclave.
Brian Hooper (5 years ago)
Not a lot to see. Access moderate, suitable for hikers, good footware essential. Good views of surrounding area. From Casares 3 hr round trip.
Manuel Rodriguez Trujillo (6 years ago)
Tres kilómetros al oeste del casco urbano de Casares se localizan las ruinas de la ciudad romana de Lacipo. Se trata de un oppidum,una fortaleza de los habitantes locales, que pasa a tener categoría de ciudad bajo dominio romano,llegando a emitir moneda propia: un toro con estrella en el anverso y un delfín en el reverso,moneda con caracteres latinos pero icografia aún dw tradición púnica. Su mayor esplendor corresponde a las épocas republicana y augustea, aunque debió pervivir a lo largo de toda la época imperial (desde el siglo III a C. al siglo II de C.).
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