Baños árabes de Ronda

Ronda, Spain

Baños árabes de Ronda is a thermal building of the Arab time, the best conserved of its kind at the Iberian Peninsula. It is located at the old arab quarter of the city, being the formerly outside quarter of the arab medina (city) of Ronda.

The bahts were built near the Arroyo de las Culebras (snakes' stream), a perfect place in order to be provided of water, which was moved by a waterwheel, in an current perfect conservation state.

The chronology of the Ronda arab bahts starts at the 13th-14th centuries. The bath is divided into three main zones, following the Roman model of thermal buildings:cold water, warm water and hot water bathrooms. The hydraulic system of the thermal bath has arrived to our days almost complete.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Spain

More Information

www.andalucia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sophie Muller (2 years ago)
Interesting ancient baths. Worth 3,50 Euro to enter.
Scott Hendrix (2 years ago)
Interesting historical spot. Note that there are two videos running on a loop inside the baths themselves- one is in Spanish and the other in English, so if you step in and don't understand the video, it's only a 10 minute or so wait until you get the other language.
Eduardo Flores (2 years ago)
This place is still like the Romans , the water is always clean and cold to the perfect temperature, remember that you are going to a natural bath environment, not and all day thing , you can bring your stuff and have picnics but remember is a sulfur bath, direct contact with nature. Parking area is about 200 meters away and no paved country road. But still great and your sling feel good. Don’t bring gold with you as sulfur reacts with gold and turn them black
Jerry Gallagher (2 years ago)
Great little exposition on ancient Arab baths. Excellent video on what they would have been like. Ruins in good condition so that you step in the building where baths were. Worth the hike.
raj badhan (2 years ago)
Great service when we entered. A very helpful guide who gave the kids a play guide. There is a short video of the history of the place in Spanish and English. Unfortunately the ruins are just that. A 3 min view and its done. But the walk up and down to the centre has the most amazing views.
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