San Miguel Castle

Almuñécar, Spain

Castillo de San Miguel is located in Almuñécar and is bounded by the remains of the original city walls. The castle sits on a small hill, which is difficult to access. The original fortifications date of 1st century BCE. During the Moorish occupation, the castle was enlarged to include towers and three gates.

At the end of the reign of the Catholic King Ferdinand in the 16th century, more was added (the moat, the drawbridge and the front entrance with its four round towers).  During the war of independence against the French, it suffered the bombing of the British troops. The ruins later became used as a Christian cemetery. The keep, which was on the inside, is demolished. There is a small museum within the castle grounds.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anne Parsons (2 years ago)
The walk up is abit of a way but worth it if you like history and the views are beautiful
Russ Devey (2 years ago)
Well worth a visit also take in the zoo/bird sanctuary beneath the castle
Chris Bartholomew (2 years ago)
The castle is perched on hill close to the shoreline. The castle itself is okay with some restoration work done on it's outer walls. The interior is basically ruins with canon and gun ports in tact. There is a short narrated video that speaks to the Roman, Moorish, Christian history of the place. There are also two small displays of artifacts which probably enough for most people. One of the finer aspects of a visit are the views of the beaches and shorelines from the castle.
Robert Siddle (2 years ago)
This is highly recommended because not only is it good to walk around the explanations and the additional information are very well presented in both Spanish and English. There is also a small museum inside that showed how the city developed with each conquering nation, excellent plus great views
Gemma Jones (2 years ago)
Very good value for money. Compact so good for toddlers and children (under close supervision as there aren't guard rails!). Interesting displays of archaeological finds. Brilliant views! Bit tricky to find though and check opening times so you aren't disappointed. Definitely worth a visit!
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