Moguer Castle

Moguer, Spain

Castillo de Moguer was renovated and enlarged in the 14th century. The oldest record document of castle dates from 1362, but it probably existed already in the Moorish age.

The castle was built of mud-based mortar gravel, clay and lime. It is of an imperfect square plan 44 by 45 metres in size, with four towers at the corners. A moat surrounded the castle, as evidenced by written records, but is not currently visible. Access to the castle was across the northwest side, now Santo Domingo Street, via a ramp. Each tower measures 9 by 9 metres and contains two chambers with a covered brick dome. The four towers were topped by battlements. A cellar dating to the 18th century, measures 22 by 10.5 metres and serves as the headquarters of the Tourist Office.

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Address

Calle Castillo 5, Moguer, Spain
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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eduardo Cervera (7 months ago)
It was closed when I went, and according to the schedule it must have been open, I could only see it through the gate.
Acisclo Pedraza Nevado (12 months ago)
know and share and since we are here ..... It is a low medieval castle, built after the Christian conquest on a date located between the second half of the 13th century and the first half of the 14th century. It is built on a low-imperial Roman settlement. It is currently absorbed within two blocks of the town of Moguer and there are numerous associated buildings, residential and industrial. The street that crosses it probably follows the layout of its main doors. The Castle of Moguer is located on a small hill, in the highest area of ​​the current town. The passage of time and the abandonment in which it has been had, make its state of conservation quite deficient. This fortress appears documented for the first time in 1362 (14th century), although it possibly dates from earlier dates. It has been the original nucleus of the city, serving as a defense for its population and its port, and it was the temporary residence of the lords of Moguer, the Portocarrero. When the manorial regime was abolished in the Cortes of Cádiz in 1812 (19th century), this castle was used as a winery and warehouse. It is of small proportions, approximately 45 meters on a side, occupies one of the highest levels of the population, dominating much of the term and mouth of the Tinto river. It is currently divided in two by Amparo Street. It has an imperfect square plan and in its corners four projecting towers rise, also with a square base. Its construction is made of rammed earth based on gravel, clay and lime mortar applied with molds. The brick, although scarce, appears in the vaults of the towers as well as reinforcing part of the exterior of the latter. Each of the four towers contained two chambers, the one on the lower level being the highest. The interior is covered with a vaulted brick thread vault, a typology that is later repeated in the kitchen of the Santa Clara monastery and that Arabs and Mudejars used with some frequency. The upper chambers of the four towers that communicated with each other through the paseo de ronda, receive wall painting decoration with typical plant motifs from the fourteenth century, according to the findings made in the South tower, the only one that has withstood the inclemencies of time and historical changes. The towers were topped, like the rest of the castle, with battlements. The parade ground was wide and open. Within the enclosure there were buildings attached to the walls. In the northern half there is a cistern of great interest and in good condition, which served to supply water to the contingent of the fortress. This work is reminiscent of Arab constructions with similar characteristics. Access to the castle was from the Northwest side. A cellar or pit surrounded part of the enclosure; This unevenness of the terrain was known in the 19th century, and even in recent times, as the Castle's gavia (Plano de Moguer by Francisco Coello, 1869). There is documentation on the use of one of the towers as a prison until the s. XVIII Currently, two blocks of houses occupy the interior of the castle and it is crossed by Amparo street. It is in a state of ruin, although part of it has recently been recovered, dedicating it to cultural activities. In its patio de Armas is the Tourist Office.
ClÁsico (12 months ago)
know and share and since we are here ..... It is a low medieval castle, built after the Christian conquest on a date located between the second half of the 13th century and the first half of the 14th century. It is built on a low-imperial Roman settlement. It is currently absorbed within two blocks of the town of Moguer and there are numerous associated buildings, residential and industrial. The street that crosses it probably follows the layout of its main doors. The Castle of Moguer is located on a small hill, in the highest area of ​​the current town. The passage of time and the abandonment in which it has been had, make its state of conservation quite deficient. This fortress appears documented for the first time in 1362 (14th century), although it possibly dates from earlier dates. It has been the original nucleus of the city, serving as a defense for its population and its port, and it was the temporary residence of the lords of Moguer, the Portocarrero. When the manorial regime was abolished in the Cortes of Cádiz in 1812 (19th century), this castle was used as a winery and warehouse. It is of small proportions, approximately 45 meters on a side, occupies one of the highest levels of the population, dominating much of the term and mouth of the Tinto river. It is currently divided in two by Amparo Street. It has an imperfect square plan and in its corners four projecting towers rise, also with a square base. Its construction is made of rammed earth based on gravel, clay and lime mortar applied with molds. The brick, although scarce, appears in the vaults of the towers as well as reinforcing part of the exterior of the latter. Each of the four towers contained two chambers, the one on the lower level being the highest. The interior is covered with a vaulted brick thread vault, a typology that is later repeated in the kitchen of the Santa Clara monastery and that Arabs and Mudejars used with some frequency. The upper chambers of the four towers that communicated with each other through the paseo de ronda, receive wall painting decoration with typical plant motifs from the fourteenth century, according to the findings made in the South tower, the only one that has withstood the inclemencies of time and historical changes. The towers were topped, like the rest of the castle, with battlements. The parade ground was wide and open. Within the enclosure there were buildings attached to the walls. In the northern half there is a cistern of great interest and in good condition, which served to supply water to the contingent of the fortress. This work is reminiscent of Arab constructions with similar characteristics. Access to the castle was from the Northwest side. A cellar or pit surrounded part of the enclosure; This unevenness of the terrain was known in the 19th century, and even in recent times, as the Castle's gavia (Plano de Moguer by Francisco Coello, 1869). There is documentation on the use of one of the towers as a prison until the s. XVIII Currently, two blocks of houses occupy the interior of the castle and it is crossed by Amparo street. It is in a state of ruin, although part of it has recently been recovered, dedicating it to cultural activities. In its patio de Armas is the Tourist Office.
Manuel (17 months ago)
Historical place, ruins of Arab castle.
Manuel Perez Gomez (17 months ago)
Very nice tourist information site and good treatment
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