Monastery of St. Clare of Moguer

Moguer, Spain

The Monastery of Santa Clara in Moguer is one of the most important examples of the mudejar architecture in occidental Andalusia. It was founded in 1337 by Sir Alonso Jofre Tenorio, an Admiral from Castile and his wife Lady Elvira Álvarez. It was a donation from Alfonso XI in 1333. It was for Franciscan- Clarisa Nuns.

The monastery was built in a place next to the villa called “Santa Clara Country”, which was integrated in the urban area thanks to the new urban tendency from the end of the 15th century and the growth of demographic population. During centuries, it had influence on the social, economic, cultural and religious life of the region.

Their patrons, “Los Portocarrero”, were connected to it; in fact, some feminine members of this family became members of the monacal community and the conventual church was a family Pantheon.

The fame and prestige achieved by the monastery made it a point of reference between the 14th and 17th centuries which was a period of expansion for other monasteries of the same religious order in Andalusia. Sister Inés Enriquez with other two sisters left the monastery in Moguer to join Maria Coronel in the foundation of the Monastery of Santa Inés in Seville in 1374. She also helped in the reforms of the Santa Clara Monastery in Cordoba with Sister Catalina de Figueroa, Sister Isabel Pacheco and Sister María de Toledo, a daughter of the Counts of La Puebla, and they also reformed the monastery of Santa Clara in Jaén.

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Founded: 1337
Category: Religious sites in Spain

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andres Dominguez Gonzalez (2 years ago)
Me encanta lo he cuidado durante 20 años como si fuese mio pero al servicio del Obispado de Huelva
Fran MarCa (2 years ago)
Me gustó mucho la visita el monasterio es fantástico el guía lo explico todo muy bien
Pedro Piquer (2 years ago)
Maravillismo, in the long term of the world and the toaster
Juan Manuel Real Molina (3 years ago)
Ok
Melina Aguilar Colon (5 years ago)
A must visit! So much history in this place, much connected to Christopher Columbus, who came to pray at this monastery after returning from his first trip in 1493. The oldest monastery in Huelva, the ticket includes a one-hour guided tour (I think only in Spanish though) from a well-knowledge local guide. You will earn more respect for this place and the history of Moguer.
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