Huelva Cathedral

Huelva, Spain

The convent church from the 17th century was destroyed by several earthquakes in the 18th century. A church rebuilt in 1775 in Neoclassical style. The church was declared a National Monument in 1970, and was elevated to the status of a cathedral in 1953.

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Details

Founded: 1775
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Maria Paloma Canta Pelaez (6 months ago)
M gusts
Elena Juste (7 months ago)
Muy bonita a pesar de ser tan moderna, aunque lo que no son modernas, sino las originales, son las figuras de su interior, el Cristo más antiguo que se salvó de las quemas de la guerra civil debido a que la iglesia formaba parte de un hospital. Para más información recomiendo visitarlo porque el Sacristán te abre las puertas, te explica todo muy bien y es muy cercano y agradable.
John Baker (2 years ago)
Worthwhile to visit, check opening times,
Juan Manuel Real Molina (2 years ago)
Ok
Im Wakwak (3 years ago)
Nice small Cathedral, a bit different looking from other known ones in Andalucia
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